Ernest A. Bell papers, 1876-1934

 

Descriptive Inventory for the Collection at Chicago History Museum, Research Center

By Ralph A. Pugh, 1991; rev. by Jennifer Asimakopolis

 

 

Please address questions to:

Chicago History Museum, Research Center

1601 North Clark Street

Chicago, IL 60614-6038

Web-site: http://www.chicagohistory.org/research

 

Copyright 2011, Chicago Historical Society, 1601 North Clark Street, Chicago, IL 60614

 

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Title: Ernest A. Bell papers, 1876-1934

Main entry: Bell, Ernest A. (Ernest Albert), 1865-1928

Inclusive dates: 1876-1934

Size:

4 linear feet (9 boxes)

1 oversize folder.

 

Terms of access: Collection is open for research use.

Provenance statement: Gift of Harold P. Bell in December 1989 (1989:0775).

Terms governing use: Copyright may be retained by the creators of items, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law, unless otherwise noted.

Please cite this collection as: Ernest A. Bell papers (Chicago History Museum) plus a detailed description, date, and box/folder number of a specific item.

 

The descriptive inventory contains the following sections:

Biographical/historical note,

Summary description of the collection,

Description of some material related to the collection,

List of online catalog headings about the collection,

Arrangement of the collection,

Detailed description of archival series in the collection,

List of contents of the collection.

 

Biographical/Historical note:

Ernest Albert Bell, Methodist clergyman, missionary to India, and crusader against Chicago's segregated 22nd Street "levee" vice district, was born in Melancthon Township, Dufferin County, in the Canadian province of Ontario on November 3, 1865, the son of Jonadab Bell and Mary Ann (Stevens) Bell. Educated in the public schools of Ontario and at Albert College in Belleville, Ontario, Bell came to the U.S. in 1883 and received his B.A. degree from Allegheny College in Meadville, Pennsylvania, in 1888. He studied philosophy and theology at Boston University from 1888 to 1890 and was ordained in the Pittsburgh Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1890. Bell preached his first sermon at a Methodist church in Grey County, Ontario, in 1883 and served as a student pastor in Pennsylvania, Ohio, New York, and Massachusetts between 1885 and 1890.

 

In 1891, Bell studied Sanskrit at Oxford University in England before sailing with his wife for the Indian subcontinent at the end of that year. Bell originally intended to serve in India under the Methodist Missionary Society, but when that society refused to send him out from England on account of his ill health, he offered his services to the Congregationalists (American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, based in Boston) who then sent him and Mrs. Bell to their mission at Jaffna in Ceylon.

 

The Bells had been in Ceylon for only a few months in early 1892 when Mrs. Bell's health collapsed, and they relocated to India in search of a healthier climate. By this point, Bell had also decided that the attraction to the Church of England, which he had first experienced at Oxford, required that he join that communion; he also was determined to follow his original intent of serving as a missionary in India. Therefore, he broke with the A.B.C.F.M. in the spring of 1892 even though he had signed on with them for five years.

 

In India, Bell again sought affiliation with Methodist bodies, but being rebuffed by them, he then followed his inclination to join the Church of England and served from September 1892 in a lay capacity under the Anglican M.D.C.S.P.G.F.P. (Madras Diocesan Committee of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts). The Anglican Bishop of Madras initially seemed to indicate that Bell could be ordained as an Anglican priest without conditions, but by early 1893, Bell discovered that the Bishop now required that he undergo the standard course of training for ordination. Feeling that the Bishop had breached their initial understanding on the ordination issue, Bell resigned from the employ of the M.D.C. in late February 1893.

 

Bell then again applied to the Methodists in India and finally won sympathy and some measure of support from J.M. Thoburn, a Methodist Episcopal Bishop whom Bell had known at Allegheny College. Thoburn placed Bell as pastor of an English-speaking church in the Indian interior at Jubbulpore. Thoburn counseled Bell to patiently forego resuming missionary work among the natives and advised him that his frequent changes of denominational affiliation had earned him a reputation for willfulness and instability among India's missionary groups. Bell's position was complicated also by the fact that the Boston Congregationalists' A.B.C.F.M. demanded compensation for its costs in outfitting Bell and sending him to Ceylon. Bell continually urged the societies with which he subsequently affiliated to pay this obligation; all refused. Bell remained at Jubbulpore until early 1894, when Bishop Thoburn prevailed upon him to return to the U.S. for the sake of his health.

 

Bell's experiences in India convinced him of the harmful influence of denominational rivalry upon Christian missions and charities. Thereafter he was always determined to stress that his work was non-sectarian in nature, and though remaining a Methodist himself, he did not hesitate to work with other Protestant groups in pursuit of Christian goals. Back in the U.S., Bell served as pastor of a St. Joseph, Missouri, congregation from 1894-1896 and of a Bellevue, Nebraska, congregation in 1896. Arriving in Chicago in October 1896, Bell graduated from the Chicago Theological Seminary in 1897 and, from 1898 until 1902 served as pastor of the Neighborhood Church in Maywood, Illinois. Dissatisfied with serving conventional congregations, by 1900 Bell was expending much energy on behalf of India (famine relief and fundraising for the foundation of a Christian university at Jubbulpore).

 

In 1902, he turned to anti-vice work in Chicago. No longer affiliated with a congregation, Bell's financial condition remained precarious until his work in the levee district (just west of State Street, between 18th and 22nd streets) resulted in founding the Midnight Mission in August 1904. Thereafter, Bell's income as superintendent of this mission was somewhat more stable.

 

In the struggle against segregated vice, Bell had found a field of activity in which he could labor free of institutional constraints, satisfy his desire to preach the Gospel openly in the streets, and involve others in a mission of his own choosing and direction. Holding nightly open-air services in the levee, Bell was repeatedly threatened by toughs in the employ of the levee's brothels and even arrested on occasion by the police. Bell's crusading activities increasingly focused public attention on the moral and public health dangers of the levee district, and he was successful in securing the cooperation of prominent Chicago church people (such as Deaconess Lucy Hall and the Rev. Melbourne P. Boynton of the Woodlawn Baptist Church) and various public officials (such as Chief Justice Harry Olson of the Chicago Municipal Court) in attempting to reverse the city's policy of segregation and regulation of vice.

 

In 1908, Bell helped found the Illinois Vigilance Association, serving as its corresponding secretary for two years. In 1910, Bell met with President Taft to urge support of a federal White Slave Traffic Act, which subsequently passed and became known as the Mann Act.

 

Bell became widely-known not only locally but internationally as an anti-vice crusader through his editing of War on the White Slave Trade (Chicago, 1909) and his translation of several works on venereal disease by Alfred Fournier. Tougher federal, state, and local legislation against obscenity and prostitution eventually resulted in prosecutions that drove the brothels of the levee district out of business in 1912-1913.

 

With the levee vice district destroyed, Bell moved his mission to the Loop, where in 1916 it became the Midnight Church, with Bell serving as its pastor. Bell continued with street preaching and worked with the Church Federation of Chicago to agitate for the continued freedom of evangelical groups to engage in open-air preaching. With the advent of radio, Bell also took to the airwaves and frequently broadcasted sermons from the Chicago Temple. India remained dear to his heart, and he continued to hope that he might return there until nearly the end of his life. He also took a strong interest in the conversion of the Jews to Christianity and served as vice president of the Chicago Gospel Mission to the Jews.

 

The destruction of the levee vice district won Bell a certain amount of fame and recognition in his final decades. In 1915 his Alma Mater (Allegheny College) awarded him an honorary Doctor of Divinity Degree, and in 1916, Boston University belatedly awarded him a theology degree on the basis of his course work of the late 1880s. Bell served as pastor of the Midnight Church until his death from a brain tumor on October 27, 1928, at West Suburban Hospital in Oak Park. During the final years of his life, he had resided at 516 N. Mayfield in Chicago's Austin neighborhood.

 

On September 17, 1890, Bell married Mary Greer, a graduate of Wesleyan University in Nebraska, and she accompanied him on his missionary work in Ceylon and India. To them were born seven children: Olive (Mrs. Farrington Daniels), Clare Ernestine, Reginald, Eleanor (Mrs. Paul Deming Williams), Harold Philip, Jesse Greer, and Frances Elizabeth. After Bell's death, his daughter Olive Bell Daniels wrote a biography of her father titled: From the Epic of Chicago: A Biography of Ernest A. Bell (Menasha, Wisconsin: 1932).

 

Summary description of the collection:

Correspondence, minutes, newsclippings, and publications produced or received by Ernest A. Bell relating to his career as a Methodist clergyman, missionary to India in 1892-1894, and anti-prostitution crusader in Chicago from 1902 onward. Topics include various Protestant missionary societies in India; Bell's efforts to aid India from the U.S. (promoting famine relief and an effort to establish a Christian university); Bell's Midnight Mission in the 22nd Street levee district in Chicago; and the successful efforts of Bell and others to eliminate segregated vice districts. Much of this material is composed of correspondence between Bell and various laymen and clergymen who shared Bell's interest in foreign missions and in anti-vice work, although some correspondence between Bell and his wife and his brothers is present in the collection also.

 

Collection includes additional correspondence about Bell in the years immediately after his death, between Bell's daughter Olive Bell Daniels and family friends. Also included are records of the Midnight Mission and the Night Church, such as board of directors meeting minutes and Bell's correspondence in his capacity as superintendent and pastor, respectively, of these institutions. Finally, the collection contains publications by Bell's Midnight Mission in Chicago as well as a number of books and leaflets generated by the anti-vice movement in the United States and Great Britain.

 

Description of some material related to the collection:

Related material at Chicago History Museum, Research Center, include the Rev. Ernest Bell photograph collection (1989.0775); the Glover family photographs (2016.0059); the published biography of Bell written by his daughter Olive Bell Daniels; and publications by Bell against prostitution, all cataloged separately.

 

List of online catalog headings about the collection:

Bell, Ernest A, (Ernest Albert), 1865-1928--Archives.

Harper, William Rainey, 1856-1906.

Allegheny College (Meadville, Pa.)

Boston University.

Chicago Gospel Mission to the Jews.

Church of England--Missions.

Illinois Vigilance Association (Chicago, Ill.)

India Famine-Relief Committee.

Midnight Mission (Chicago, Ill.)

Neighborhood Church (Maywood, Ill.)

Night Church (Chicago, Ill.)

Bishops--India.

Christian communities--Illinois--Chicago.

Church work with prostitutes--Illinois--Chicago.

Clergy--Illinois--Chicago.

Congregationalists--Massachusetts--Boston.

Families--Illinois--Chicago.

Famines--India.

Fathers--Illinois--Chicago.

Jewish Christians--Illinois--Chicago.

Methodist Church--Clergy.

Methodist Church--Missions.

Missionaries--India.

Missions to Hindus.

Prayers.

Preaching--Illinois--Chicago.

Procuresses--Illinois--Chicago.

Prostitution--Illinois--Chicago.

Protestant churches--Missions--India.

Religion.

Temperance--United States--Societies, etc.

Vice control--Illinois--Chicago.

Viceroys' spouses--India.

Chicago (Ill.)--Religious life and customs--19th century.

Chicago (Ill.)--Religious life and customs--20th century.

Chicago (Ill.)--Social conditions--19th century.

Chicago (Ill.)--Social conditions--20th century.

Chicago (Ill.)--Social life and customs--19th century.

Chicago (Ill.)--Social life and customs--20th century.

Near South Side (Chicago, Ill.)

Great Britain--Colonies--Asia.

Great Britain--Description and travel--19th century.

India--History--British occupation, 1765-1947.

Sri Lanka--Civilization--Christian influences.

 

Form/genre:

Correspondence.

Minutes.

Newspaper clippings.

 

Added entries:

Bonney, Charles Carroll, 1831-1903.

Boynton, Melbourne P.

Burgess, William, 1843-1922.

Daniels, Olive Bell, 1891-1984.

Farwell, Arthur Burrage, 1852-1936.

Hallam, Wirt W.

Howland, S. W.

Huckel, Oliver, 1864-1940.

Lawson, Victor Freemont, 1850-1925.

Taylor, Graham, 1851-1938.

Thoburn, J. M. (James Mills), 1836-1922.

Allegheny College (Meadville, Pa.)

Boston University.

Chicago Gospel Mission to the Jews.

Illinois Vigilance Association.

India Famine-Relief Committee.

Midnight Mission (Chicago, Ill.)

Neighborhood Church (Maywood, Ill.)

Night Church (Chicago, Ill.)

Great Britain--England--Oxfordshire--Oxford.

India.

Sri Lanka.

United States--Illinois--Cook County--Chicago.

 

Arrangement of the collection:

The papers are arranged in three series:

Series 1. Personal papers

Subseries 1. Correspondence and topical files

Subseries 2. Biographical material

Subseries 3. Appointment books and finances

Series 2. The Midnight Mission

Series 3. Publications and artifacts

 

Detailed description of archival series in the collection:

Series 1. Personal papers (box 1-4)

This series contains all of Bell's correspondence other than his correspondence pertaining to the Neighborhood Church of Maywood, the Midnight Mission, and the Night Church (which are in Series 2). Also included are biographical materials on Bell as well as Bells' appointment books and financial records. It is composed of three subseries:

Subseries 1. Correspondence and topical files

Subseries 2. Biographical material

Subseries 3. Appointment books and finances

 

Subseries 1 contains Bell's correspondence with family members as well as with all his various associates in mission and church work, excepting those correspondence files pertaining to the operation of Bell's Midnight Mission and Midnight Church, which are in Series 2. Though Bell's career as a Christian missionary and minister underwent many changes of direction, he had many lifelong friends who loved him deeply, kept in regular contact, and offered him encouragement and advice. Very few individuals ever broke with Rev. Bell permanently; most realizing that his zeal for righteousness was not intolerance or lack of learning but rather the expression of a genuine faith, which involved Bell in many self-sacrifices.

 

Among those whom Bell met at Boston University and carried on a lifelong correspondence are the Rev. Oliver Huckel, a Congregational minister in Baltimore who took a friendly interest in Bell's activities from afar and who collaborated with Bell in crafting verses for hymns; Dr. Marcus D. Buell of Boston's Theology Department; and the department president, W.F. Warren.

 

Bell's correspondence with colleagues in the mission field includes letters from N.G. Clark of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions in Boston; Margaret W. Leith, a patroness of the A.B.C.F.M.; and S. L. Howland of the A.B.C.F.M.'s Ceylon Mission. Clark and Leith penned reproachful letters to Bell in mid-1892 following his break with their mission, and Bell's friendship with Leith was permanently damaged though Clark eventually came to respect Bell's decision. Howland remained cordial throughout the affair. Another prominent correspondent during the India years was A. Wescott of the Madras Diocesan Committee (Anglican), who coordinated Bell's activities in 1892-1893 during the months of his affiliation with the Anglicans. Most revealing of Bells' complicated situation in India is his correspondence with Bishop J.M. Thoburn of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Bell wrote openly to Thoburn about the misunderstandings and betrayals he had endured in India, while Thoburn with equal candor told Bell that he was seen by others as unstable and inadaptable to the missionary life. Bell's correspondence files also contain a fair number of self-justifying letters written to the Anglican Bishop of Madras but (at Mrs. Bell's urging) never sent.

 

Following his return to America, Bell remained in contact with fellow missionaries Harvey Reeves Calkins at Jubbulpore and Malcolm Goldsmith of the Church Mission Society (Anglican) at Hyderabad. Bell also corresponded for years with T.H. Dodson of St. Paul's College in Lincolnshire, England. Bell perhaps met Dodson at Oxford.

 

Following the inception of Bell's anti-vice work in Chicago, his correspondence gradually shifted from India-based concerns (although that interest never entirely disappeared) to those (financial, logistical, spiritual) connected with the war on the levee vice district. In his efforts on behalf of India, Bell corresponded frequently with fellow Chicagoan Charles C. Bonney, who was president of the Christian University Fund for India (of which Bell was the secretary) and also chairman of the India Famine-Relief Committee (again, with Bell the secretary). On behalf of anti-vice efforts, Bell kept up correspondence with fellow reformers Arthur Burrage Farwell, a member both of the Chicago Law and Order League and the Illinois Vigilance Association, as well as with the Rev. William Burgess, a Congregational minister, and with Wirt W. Hallam, a Chicago manufacturer/broker and member of the Vice Commission of Chicago.

 

During the anti-levee vice district fight, Bell was involved in disputes over tactics with Dr. Graham Taylor of the Chicago Commons settlement house. Following the elimination of the levee, however, Taylor acknowledged that Bell's approach to the problem had been more direct and appropriate than his. Near the end of Bell's life he received a letter from Taylor (February 5, 1927) which concluded "that song you sung at me eight years ago sings on still soaring overhead of all I was, am, or may be--except your fighting me hard & fighting me strong--when I was wrong--and that friendly criticism expresses the truest friendship."

 

Bell's correspondence with several wealthy Chicagoans while seeking financial support for his various projects is of particular interest. In 1900, Bell wrote and paid a visit to Chicago real estate magnate Levi Leiter, whose daughter Mary, Lady Curzon, was the Vicereine of India, seeking to involve Leiter in supporting famine relief efforts for India. To Bell's dismay, Leiter refused even though the Vicereine had endorsed the efforts of Bell's committee. Also of interest is an October 18, 1909, letter from Victor Lawson, publisher of the Chicago Daily News, to Bell; in it Lawson (a prominent financial supporter of Bell's Midnight Mission) announces that an enclosed check for $560 was intended only to pay the arrears in Bell's salary and not to go to the board of the mission, which Lawson declared to be incompetent.

 

Also at the end of this subseries is correspondence which Bell conducted with his wife Mary from the days of their courtship through the end of his life, along with correspondence he conducted with his brothers Chauncey, a grain merchant, and John, a medical doctor. Bell's correspondence with these two brothers is extremely revealing as they were both very free in giving advice and in criticizing Bell's career, regardless of the evident affection they had for him.

 

Subseries 2 contains news clippings and articles that give biographical information on Bell at various stages of his career as well as his academic degrees, obituaries, testimonials, and the correspondence which Bell's daughter Olive Daniels conducted with Bell's friends and colleagues during the years when she was researching and writing a biography of her father.

 

Subseries 3 contains Bell's series of little leather appointment books which date from 1892 through 1928. In these books, Bell entered not only notations about upcoming meetings and events but also recorded his spiritual resolutions, prayers, and small descriptions of poignant incidents. Loose scraps of paper enclosed in these notebooks also record prayers and observations in which Bell comments freely on people who had helped or hindered his work, such as one dated October 27, 1896, in which Bell recounts a visit to President William Rainey Harper of the University of Chicago: "I called upon President Harper of the magnificent new University of Chicago whom I had met at Yale before I went to India. He did not know me and would not receive me as it was not his office hour--ordered me to come back next day at half past two. He was fat and sleek and proud and had not even a handshake for one who had hazarded life and all things for our Savior Christ."

 

Series 2. The Midnight Mission (box 4-5)

This series contains correspondence and minutes, 1906-1928, which are specifically connected with the pastoral and anti-vice efforts of Bell's Midnight Mission, subsequently known as the Night Church. The early correspondence in this series (through 1913) includes letters to members of the mission's board informing them of upcoming meetings and fundraising correspondence, culminating in a letter from Bell to the directors dated October 8, 1912, in which he announces the police closing of portions of the levee vice district ("'Fallen is Babylon!'") and declares that "with the fall of the vice districts the methods of night evangelism must be modified to meet the new environment." The minutes of the mission's board of directors include not only financial statements for the mission but also plans for evangelism of the vice district and the purchase of a building for the mission; reports from Bell as superintendent of the mission are also present.

 

The correspondence and minutes for the Night Church, which the Midnight Mission was renamed in 1916, reflect a quieter mission; with the fight against the vice districts won, Bell shifted to more traditional forms of evangelism and street preaching. This latter material also shows, however, that Bell even in his mid-50s still desired to return to India. A letter to Victor Lawson dated July 3, 1919, and typed on the letterhead of the Night Church appeals to Lawson for an annuity for twenty years so that he could devote his final years to promoting Christian higher education in India.

 

Series 3. Publications and artifacts (box 5-9)

This series contains printed material pertaining to the international anti-prostitution movement of the 1900-1915 period and to India, with the former topic being represented largely by monographs and the latter by newspaper clippings and pamphlets. Many of Bell's published works are included in this series, including several editions of his pamphlet "An Oxford in India" (which advocates a Christian university in India). This series also contains a box of souvenirs/artifacts.

 

List of contents of the collection:

Series 1. Personal papers (box 1-4)

Subseries 1. Correspondence and topical files

box 1

folders:

1 Correspondence, general, 1876-1890

2 Correspondence, general, 1891

3 Correspondence, general, Jan.-June 1892

4 Correspondence, general, July-Dec. 1892

5 Correspondence, general, Jan.-Mar. 1893

6 Correspondence, general, Apr.-June 1893

7 Correspondence, general, July-Dec. 1893

8 Correspondence, general, 1894-1899

9 Correspondence, general, 1900-1901

10 Correspondence, general, 1902-1903

11 Correspondence, general, 1904-1909

12 Correspondence, general, 1910-1912

 

box 2

folders:

1 Correspondence, general, 1913-1915

2 Correspondence, general, 1916-1919

3 Correspondence, general, 1920-1925

4 Correspondence, general, 1926-1928

5 Family members, 1890-1900

6 Family members, 1901-1910

7 Family members, 1911-1928

8 Mary (Mrs. Ernest A.) Bell, 1890

9 Mary (Mrs. Ernest A.) Bell, 1891-1896

10 Mary (Mrs. Ernest A.) Bell, 1901-1903

11 Mary (Mrs. Ernest A.) Bell, 1909-1928

12 Topical writings: India

13 Topical writings: The Neighborhood Church of Maywood, 1901-1905

14 Topical writings: Miscellaneous personal writings

 

Series 1. Personal papers (box 1-4) - continued

Subseries 2. Biographical material

box 3

folders:

1 Biographical material, 1884-1925

2 Naturalization papers, 1886

3 Degrees (also see Ernest Bell oversize folder)

4 Tributes upon fiftieth birthday, 1915

5 Illness and death, 1928

6 Obituaries and testimonials, 1928-1929

7 Correspondence of Olive Bell Daniels for biography of Ernest Albert Bell, 1928-1929

8 Correspondence of Olive Bell Daniels for biography of Ernest Albert Bell, 1930

9-10 Correspondence of Olive Bell Daniels for biography of Ernest Albert Bell, 1931

11 Correspondence of Olive Bell Daniels for biography of Ernest Albert Bell, 1932-1934

 

Series 1. Personal papers (box 1-4) - continued

Subseries 3. Appointment books and finances

12 Diaries/appointment books, 1892-1900

13 Diaries/appointment books, 1902-1903, 1910-1911

14 Diaries/appointment books, 1912-1914, 1915-1917

 

box 4:

folders:

1 Diaries/appointment books, 1918-1919, 1920-1922

2 Diaries/appointment books, 1923-1928

3 Cash accounts, 1897-1925

4 Cash books, 1902-1916, 1904-1912

5 Cash books, notebooks, 1913; savings book, 1906-1914

6 Receipts, 1906-1926

 

Series 2. The Midnight Mission (box 4-5)

box 4 - continued

folders:

7 Midnight Mission correspondence, 1907-1911

8 Midnight Mission correspondence, 1912-1913

9 Meeting minutes, 1906-1909

 

box 5

folders:

1 Meeting minutes, 1910

2 Meeting minutes, 1911

3 Meeting minutes, 1912

4 Meeting minutes, 1913

5 Meeting minutes, 1914-1915

6 Meeting minutes, 1916

7 Night Church correspondence, 1918-1920

8 Night Church correspondence, 1921-1925

9 Night Church correspondence, 1926-1928

10 Meeting minutes, 1918-1928

 

Series 3. Publications and artifacts

box 5 - continued

folders:

11 Newspaper clippings: articles by Bell

12 Newspaper clippings: articles about Bell

 

box 6

folders:

1 Newspaper clippings, topics: India

2 Newspaper clippings, topics: vice in Chicago

3 Newspaper clippings, topics: Oliver Huckel

4 Newspaper clippings, topics: miscellaneous

5 Pamphlets and flyers by Bell: "An Oxford in India"

6 Pamphlets and flyers by Bell: "Can We Know God?"

7 Pamphlets and flyers by Bell: miscellaneous

8 Books written and/or edited by Bell: "War on the White Slave Trade" 1909

9 Books written and/or edited by Bell: "White Slavery Today" 1917

10 Books written and/or edited by Bell: works contributed to by Bell or translated by Bell

11 Publications of The Chicago Gospel Mission to the Jews

12 Publications of The Illinois Vigilance Association

13-14 Publications of The Midnight Mission

 

box 7

folders:

1 Publications of The Night Church

2 Publications on various topics: Jewish issues

3 Publications on various topics: temperance

4 Publications on various topics: vice

5-6 Publications on various topics: miscellaneous, U.S.

7-9 Publications on various topics: India

10 Publications on various topics: "Report of the Indian Famine Charitable Relief Fund" 1900

11 Publications on various topics: "Report of the Indian Universities Commission 1902

12 Publications on various topics: miscellaneous, foreign

 

box 8

books:

Allegheny College Alumni Register, 1925

Burgess, William, The World's Social Evil, 1914

Chicago Theological Seminary Register Annual Catalog, 1925-1926

Christian Education (World Missionary Conference, 1910)

Clouston, Sir Thomas, Morals and Brains (London, 1912)

Coote, William Alexander, A Vision and Its Fulfillment (National Vigilance Association, 1910)

Craven, T., The Popular Dictionary: English and Roman Urdu (Lucknow, 1889)

Friends' General Conference 1908

Hindustani Git Ki Kitab (Lucknow, 1906)

Hirsch, E.G., The Crucifixion, 1892

Huckel, Oliver, Christian Science and Common Sense 1899

Wescott, Brooke Foss and Fenton John Anthony Hort, The New Testament in the Original Greek (New York, 1904)

 

box 9

artifacts/souvenirs:

Stone figurine from India or Ceylon

Purse

Silk scarf

Wooden tissue box

Piece of wood from slave auction block, Hotel Royal, New Orleans

Medicine bottle

Letter opener

 

Old list of card catalog headings:

The following headings were placed in the Archives & Manuscripts card catalog:

Subjects:

Bell, Ernest A., 1865-1928.

Bishops--India.

Christian communities--Illinois--Chicago.

Church of England--Missions.

Church work with prostitutes--Illinois--Chicago.

Clergy--Illinois--Chicago.

Congregationalists--Massachusetts--Boston.

Family--Illinois--Chicago.

Famines--India.

Fathers--Illinois--Chicago.

Great Britain--Colonies--Asia.

Great Britain--Description and travel.

Harper, William Rainey, 1856-1906.

India--History--British Occupation, 1765-1947.

Jewish Christians--Illinois--Chicago.

Methodist Church--Clergy.

Methodist Church--Missions.

Missionaries--India.

Missions to Hindus.

Prayers.

Preaching--Illinois--Chicago.

Procuresses--Illinois--Chicago.

Prostitution--Illinois--Chicago.

Protestant churches--Missions--India.

Religion.

Sri Lanka--Civilization--Christian influences.

Temperance--Societies, etc--United States.

Vice Control--Illinois--Chicago.

Viceroys' spouses--India.

 

Added entries:

Allegheny College (Meadville, Pa.)

Bonney, Charles C.

Boston University (Boston, Mass.)

Boynton, Melbourne P.

Burgess, William.

Chicago Gospel Mission to the Jews.

Daniels, Olive Bell.

Farwell, Arthur Burrage, 1852-1936.

Hallam, Wirt W.

Howland, S.W.

Huckel, Oliver.

Illinois Vigilance Association.

India Famine-Relief Committee.

Lawson, Victor Fremont, 1850-1925.

Midnight Mission (Chicago, Ill.)

Neighborhood Church (Maywood, Ill.)

Night Church (Chicago, Ill.)

Taylor, Graham, 1851-1938.

Thoburn, J.M.