Raymond M. Hilliard papers, 1922-1967

 

Descriptive Inventory for the Collection at Chicago History Museum, Research Center

By Ms. Merle Jacob, 1966; rev. by Archie Motley; rev. by Chris Tounsel

 

 

Please address questions to:

Chicago History Museum, Research Center

1601 North Clark Street

Chicago, IL 60614-6038

Web-site: http://www.chicagohistory.org/research

 

Copyright 2014, Chicago Historical Society

 

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Title: Raymond M. Hilliard papers [manuscript], 1922-1967

Main entry: Hilliard, Raymond M, 1907-1966.

Inclusive dates: 1922-1967

Size:

67 linear ft.

1 oversize folder.

 

Collection ID#: CHM66766

Restriction: In order to consult boxes 9-32, 35, 39-44, 77-110, 114-115, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

Restriction: Boxes 147 to 152 are closed until 2035; box 153 is closed until 2036.

Provenance statement: Gift of James P. Hilliard (M1966.0598; M1966.0625), Mrs. Raymond Hilliard (M1967.0651), Mrs. Mildred Walter (M1967.0691), and the Cook County Department of Public Aid (M1967.0691, M1968.0719, M1969.0051, M1971.0691).

Terms governing use: Copyright may be retained by the creators of items, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.

Please cite this collection as: Raymond M. Hilliard papers (Chicago History Museum) plus a detailed description, date, and box/folder number of a specific item.

 

This descriptive inventory contains the following sections:

Biographical/historical note,

Historical note on public welfare assistance in Illinois and the Cook County Department of Public Aid,

Summary description of the collection,

Description of some materials related to this collections,

List of abbreviations used in this document,

List of online catalog headings about the collection,

Arrangement of the collection,

Detailed description of archival series in the collection,

List of contents of the collection.

Old list of card catalog headings for this collection.

 

Biographical/historical note:

Raymond Marcellus Hilliard (1907-1966) was a leader in establishing efficient public welfare administration and delivering services to people in need in Illinois, especially Southern Illinois (1933-1948), in New York City (1948-1953), and in Chicago and Cook County, Illinois (1940s and 1954-1966).

 

He was born in Washington, D.C., on Aug. 8, 1907, to Patrick and Ann (Kelly) Hilliard. Raymond moved with his family to Chicago in 1911, where he attended St. Philip Neri grade school (1913-1921) and Mount Carmel High School in the city (1921-1925), graduating as Valedictorian. He attended Notre Dame University 1925-1928, majoring in Philosophy. After the death of his father in 1928, Hilliard returned to Chicago. He attended the University of Chicago from 1928 through 1932, when he received a Ph.D. in English; and DePaul University Law School 1930-1933, receiving his LL.B. in 1933. While attending law school, he taught English on a part-time basis at Crane High School. Until his admission to the Illinois Bar in 1934, he served as a clerk in the law office of Schnackenberg, Hansen, and Towle.

 

Raymond Hilliard indirectly entered social welfare work in 1934 when he became an Assistant Attorney General for the State of Illinois. He was assigned as the Legal Representative and Director of Investigation to the Illinois Emergency Relief Commission (the predecessor to the Illinois Public Aid Commission, which later became the Illinois Department of Public Aid). He remained in this position until May 1940, when he became Assistant Attorney General for the State of Illinois in charge of the Retailer's Occupational Tax Division. In May 1941, Hilliard took the position of assistant to the executive secretary of the Illinois Public Aid Commission (IPAC), and in September 1942 became executive secretary of the commission (a position he held until March 1948).

 

As executive secretary of the IPAC, Raymond Hilliard placed great emphasis upon attacking dependency at its source. He introduced measures resulting in: 1. the elimination of waiting lists for ADC recipients; 2. the merger of all public assistance and relief functions into one agency to avoid duplication of effort and expense; 3. the introduction of the County Home Program in the United States, which resulted in recognition of the need for state and federally supported institutional facilities for the chronically ill; 4. the passage of a state law requiring the placing of silver nitrate in the eyes of newborn babies, thus preventing glaucoma (which had been the most frequent cause of blindness in Illinois); 5. the modernizing and streamlining of civil service procedures affecting public assistance administration. It was estimated that efficiencies in this area saving Illinois taxpayers 57 million dollars over a six-year period. He also was active in the economic rehabilitation of the sixteen southernmost counties of Illinois, known as Little Egypt, where the dependency level was abnormally high.

 

During this period, Hilliard also served as secretary of the Illinois Commission on the Chronically Ill (1943-1947), secretary of the Illinois Public Assistance Laws Commission (1945-1947), member of the board of directors of the American Public Welfare Association (1946-1952), and faculty member of the Loyola University School of Social Work (1947-1948).

 

In March 1948, Hilliard resigned as Executive Secretary of the Illinois Public Aid Commission to become commissioner of the Department of Welfare of the City of New York, a position he held until April 1951. The State of New York waived its state employee residence requirements so that Hilliard and the four welfare administrators he brought with him from Illinois could be employed in the department. Hilliard took this post at the request of Mayor William O'Dwyer, who wanted a commissioner who would suppress Communist influence in the department and reorganize the department. Succeeding in both tasks, Hilliard modernized the department's physical plant and streamlined the administration of relief, reputedly saving taxpayers 10 million dollars during his first year in office. As commissioner he also established the "Hart Island" project for the rehabilitation of homeless men in the Bowery district and set up a public foster home program for dependent children.

 

In April 1951 Hilliard resigned as commissioner of the Department of Welfare to become executive director of the Welfare and Health Council of New York City, a private organization coordinating the work of all principal public and private welfare and health agencies in New York City. As director, he reorganized the council and supervised its merger with the Health Council. He placed the combined council on a sound fiscal basis, encouraged greater participation by public officials in its work, and increased the membership of private agencies in the council. He resigned this position in June 1953, when a struggle developed between council members over efforts to bar the Planned Parenthood organization from participation.

 

In his capacity as commissioner of New York's Department of Welfare, Raymond Hilliard officially served as: chairman of the Mayor's Committee on Child Care (1948-1951); chairman of the New York City Commission for the Foster Care of Children (1948-1951); chairman of the Mayor's Committee on Homeless Men (1949-1951); chairman of the Mayor's Committee on Displaced Persons (1948-1951); member of the board of directors of the New York City Youth Board (1948-1951); chairman of the Mayor's Advisory Committee for the Aged (1949-1953); and chairman of the Mayor's Committee on Puerto Rican Affairs (1948-1953).

 

While in New York, Hilliard also served as: member of the board of directors of the Hospital Council of Greater New York (1948-1953): member of the Distribution Committee and Public Employees Section of the Greater New York Fund (1951-1953); member of the Advisory Board of Riverside Hospital (1951-1953); co-chairman of the board of directors of the National Conference of Christians and Jews, Manhattan/Westchester Region (1951-1953); and chairman of the Committee on Community Organizations of the NCCJ (1951-1953).

 

Raymond Hilliard was appointed assistant director of the Cook County Department of Welfare in 1954. When Joseph Moss retired as director in June 1954 (after serving in the position since 1926), Hilliard was appointed to succeed him by Daniel Ryan (Democrat), president of the Cook County Board of Commissioners, on the recommendation of William N. Erickson, a Republican and past president of the board. Hilliard remained a political independent in Chicago, never registering in either party primary although he had registered as a Republican in New York City, where he was required by law to declare his party.

 

Hilliard's responsibilities increased in 1958 when the Cook County Department of Welfare/CCPDA and the Chicago Department of Welfare merged, and the General Assistance Program then came under his supervision. Throughout his 12 years as director, he strove to improve the efficiency of the welfare programs. Expanding upon the hospital aide and domestic worker programs initiated by Joseph Moss, the department was innovator in attacking the root causes of poverty. Although the costs of the welfare program increased during these years, the number of people on welfare rolls decreased in virtue of the numerous departmental programs that assisted relief recipients to become self-supporting through job training and improved education.

 

On the national level, Hilliard sought to improve welfare legislation and to promote a better understanding of people who were poor. Through frequent correspondence with welfare workers and Congressmen all over the country, and by his participation in organizations and conferences on welfare, he worked to educate and influence public and congressional opinion on new methods of attacking the problems of poverty. Many of his suggestions on social security were incorporated into the federal social security laws. Many techniques later employed in the War on Poverty programs were suggested by Raymond Hilliard before they were applied through national programs. Hilliard also was greatly involved in improving race relations and in promoting understanding among peoples of different religious faiths; he particularly emphasized equal rights and opportunities for African Americans and Puerto Ricans.

 

Raymond Hilliard also participated actively in many local and national organizations, especially as chairman of the National Conference of Christians and Jews' Commission on Community Organizations (1956-1958); chairman of the American Public Welfare Association's Committee on Aging (1956-1958); chairman of the National Council of Local Public Welfare Administrators (1961-1963); member of the board of directors of the American Public Welfare Association; chairman of the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice (1962-1966); member of the board of directors of the Catholic Inter-Racial Council; consultant to the American Medical Association's Committee on Welfare Services; member of the board of directors of the Chicago Urban League; member of the board of directors of the Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago; member of the executive committee of the National Conference of Christians and Jews, Chicago Region; member of Mayor Daley's Commission on Aging; member of the Chicago Committee on Urban Opportunity; member of the Governor's Advisory Council on the Improvement of the Economic and Social Status of Older People; member of the Chicago Association of Commerce and Industry's Committee on Full Employment; member of the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty; member of President Johnson's National Citizen's Committee for Community Relations; and a member of the White House Conference on Poverty.

 

As director of the Cook County Department of Welfare and its successor, the Cook County Department of Public Aid, from 1954 through July 4, 1966, Raymond Hilliard initiated many programs and techniques that earned him the unofficial title of "Mr. Welfare." Although a controversial figure, he was recognized as an outstanding administrator and a man of social vision.

 

Raymond M. Hilliard died in Chicago on Monday, July 4, 1966. He was survived by his wife, Mary Catherine (Reardon), whom he married in 1935; and by their two sons: Raymond Marcellus Hilliard, Jr., who was born in February 1936, and later resided in LaMarque, Texas; and James Philip Hilliard, born in April 1937, who later resided in Morton Grove, Illinois, and was a member of the Chicago law firm of Springer and Casey.

 

Historical note on public welfare assistance in Illinois and the Cook County Department of Public Aid:

State responsibility for the care of poor people in Illinois was first recognized in the Northwest Territory's poor law of 1790. When the laws of the Northwest Territory were revised in 1795, many features that still distinguish our relief laws were introduced, viz.: local residence requirements for eligibility; financial responsibility of relatives; efforts to assist the poor to become as self-supporting as possible; care for ill people who are unable to provide for themselves. At that time, responsibility for public assistance was vested either in county or township governments, which received their funds through local taxation. In 1835, the State of Illinois made one year's residence a legal requirement for obtaining aid. Subsequently this term was raised to three years, and in 1945 lowered again to one year. County poor houses were introduced in 1839 in Illinois; and over a hundred years later in 1945, they were converted into nursing homes for people with disabilities and chronic illness.

 

Public welfare services in Illinois were decentralized until 1917, and "pauper laws" were revised only as local situations demanded. Under the Illinois Civil Administrative Code of 1917, the state government tried to centralize some control over relief matters by establishing code departments that were responsible directly to the governor. A Department of Public Welfare was established for the operation of penal and mental institutions, supervision of children in foster homes, and administration of blind pensions, authorized by the state in 1908, and the mothers' pension, authorized in 1911. In 1927, the state for the first time contributed funds for these programs to counties and townships on a matching or grant-in-aid basis.

 

In 1925, an act of the state legislature established the Cook County Bureau of Public Welfare, which became the Cook County Department of Welfare in 1949, and in 1958 became the Cook County Department of Public Aid (CCDPA). The 1925 law granted the county authority to conduct local programs of service and assistance. Under the directorship of Joseph L. Moss, the Cook County Bureau of Public Welfare operated four consolidated divisions: Court and Institutions for Correction and Detention, Field Service, Medical Service, and Camp Reinberg.

 

The Behavior Clinic of the Criminal Court and the Rural Public Health Nursing Service were added as divisions in 1931. The department's functions included family service, outdoor relief, relief to the blind in their homes, relief to veterans under the Bogardus Act, adjustment of non-support and divorce cases in which alimony and minor children were concerned, social service for persons confined in Cook County Jail, deportation of non-residents, admissions to the Cook County Hospital and Infirmary, medical service to families in their homes, transportation for those admitted to state schools for the blind and deaf, and a summer camp for poor people.

 

By 1930, the patchwork of local and state welfare operations in Illinois was unable to cope with the problems of the Great Depression. In February 1932, the state legislature designated the Illinois Emergency Relief Commission (Federal) to administer 20 million dollars in state relief funds. By July of that year, these funds were exhausted, but the federal government continued to supply general funds directly to the commission for relief payments until 1935, when the U.S. Works Progress Administration and Social Security programs were introduced.

 

General relief in Illinois from 1932 to 1935 was administered through the IERC (Federal) rather than through the machinery previously established by the local pauper laws. The decision to work through the IERC (Federal) rather than the various local-level relief agencies across the state was based partially on the assumption that the major relief expenditures were temporary measures that would be discontinued as soon as possible. The IERC (Federal) itself had to be re-chartered every two years by the state legislature.

 

In Cook County, the Public Assistance division of the Cook County Bureau of Public Welfare served as an agent for the IERC to administer relief for the county. The IERC underwrote the expenses while the Cook County Bureau of Public Welfare furnished the personnel. In 1933, this relationship ended, and the IERC assumed direct responsibility for relief through its own Cook County Relief Administration. The Public Assistance Division of the Cook County Bureau of Public Welfare adjusted to serve as part of the Cook County Relief Administration from 1933 to 1936.

 

When federal funding to the IERC (Federal) ended after 1935, general assistance was handled through local township governments in Cook County.

 

According to one history, the Chicago Welfare Administration became officially known as the City of Chicago Welfare Administration in June 1942, and in 1946, became known as the Department of Welfare of the City of Chicago. According to other sources, the Chicago (Ill.) Department of Public Welfare, was created in 1914, and changed name in July 1936 to the Chicago (Ill.) Department of Welfare. The department administered general assistance to Chicago residents only until 1958 when it merged with the Cook County Department of Welfare to become the Cook County Department of Public Aid. General assistance in the rest of Illinois (outside Cook County) continued to be handled by township governments in the other counties.

 

In other areas of public welfare (besides general assistance), the growing number of programs and agencies led to duplication of efforts and waste. When Social Security was introduced in 1936, Illinois amended its Old Age Assistance Act to meet federal requirements and to receive matching federal funds. The Cook County Bureau of Public Welfare, under the supervision of the Illinois Department of Public Welfare, administered old age pensions in Cook County. Yet the general assistance program was supervised by the IERC; the Mothers' Pension operated through the Division of Child Welfare of the Illinois Department of Public Welfare; and the County Blind Relief operated through the Auditor of Public Accounts.

 

From 1941 to 1949, the state worked to organize and streamline its welfare services. The IERC was succeeded by a permanent agency named the Illinois Public Aid Commission (IPAC) in 1941. The IPAC was intended to be a policy-making commission, politically non-partisan and representative of the various geographical sections of the state. Of its ten members, seven were appointed by the governor, and three state officials served as ex-officio members.

 

The Consolidated Relief Bills of 1943 placed the categorical relief programs of the Illinois Department of Public Welfare under the supervision of the Illinois Public Aid Commission so that one agency would have charge of all outdoor assistance programs. Old Age Assistance, Aid to Dependent Children (passed in 1943 to replace the 1903 Blind Law), and many other relief programs receiving state or federal funds were administered through county departments. The IPAC also could allocate state funds to local government units for aid to the people who were medically indigent in the state with the exception of Cook County, which was barred by legislation from receiving state funds. This ban was partially lifted in 1951 to allow Cook County to be reimbursed for the treatment of medically-indigent people who were treated in public institutions. The state's final act of reorganizing its welfare program was the enactment of a Public Assistance Code in 1949, which brought together for the first time all the laws pertaining to welfare in the state.

 

While the fundamental purpose of the Cook County Department of Welfare was the administration of categorical assistance to relief recipients, it also sought to enable aid recipients to become self-supporting. When the Illinois legislature refused to appropriate funds for the operation of Camp Reinberg in 1946, the Cook County Department of Welfare helped bring together non-governmental welfare organizations and form the Camp Reinberg Association to operate the camp. The necessary operational funds were supplied by the Community Fund, other non-profit organizations, and government agencies using the camp. For many years, the Cook County Department of Welfare sent hundreds of ADC families to Camp Reinberg. Under Joseph Moss, the department also established a Vocation Counseling and Placement Service in 1951 (later called the Welfare Rehabilitation Service) and the Homemakers Program, to train women receiving ADC-benefits as homemakers and then to employ them to care for other ADC families in which the chief care-giver was sick.

 

After Joseph Moss's retirement in 1954, Raymond Hilliard directed the department until his death in July 1966. Hilliard continued to expand its services through programs to attack welfare dependency. In 1955, a Child Welfare Division was established to care for the children of Cook County who did not qualify for services from sectarian agencies or from the Children's Division of the Chicago Department of Welfare (which was incorporated into the CCDPA's Child Welfare Division following the 1958 merger of the Chicago and Cook County departments). Through the efforts of the CCDPA's Child Welfare Division to find new foster homes for children and to increase the number of African American adoptions, the Boarder Baby Ward of Cook County Hospital was finally closed in 1965 after 30 years of operation.

 

Among the programs introduced by the CCDPA to aid relief recipients were a Geriatric Rehabilitation Service in conjunction with Michael Reese Hospital (1956); alcoholic rehabilitation treatment for men on Skid Row, with the help of the Salvation Army (1958); Rockwell Gardens demonstration project, in which rehabilitation units were established in public housing projects (1960); intensive casework units for especially difficult ADC cases (1960); a massive attack on illiteracy among adult aid recipients through adult education classes set up with the help of the Chicago Board of Education (1962); and urban living and household management classes conducted in public housing projects (1965).

 

With the receipt of increased federal funds from the War on Poverty Program, the CCDPA greatly expanded its job-training programs. Programs were established with the aid of unions, businesses, and other organizations to train relief recipients as licensed practical nurses and nurses' aides, Yellow Cab drivers, gas station attendants and managers, laundry room attendants, building custodians, wood and furniture finishers, IBM key-punch operators, retail salespeople, institutional diet and kitchen helpers, chefs and short-order cooks, and office-machine operators.

 

In the 1960s, the Cook County Department of Public Aid's emphasized helping relief recipients to help themselves through education, job training, and medical rehabilitation. However, the Department's major task was still the supervision of relief, which was carried out in four separate divisions:

1. The Public Assistance Division, which administered all categorical assistance on a county-wide basis, and general assistance in the City of Chicago. This division operated through eight bureaus: welfare administration, resources and legal services, medical and institutional service, home economics and family improvement, training and education, staff development, food stamp operation, and housing.

2. The Children's Division, which provided foster home care, adoption, institutional placement, and related services for children under their care.

3. The Court Services Division, which handled the legal activities of the department in support and alimony, desertion, and fraud cases.

4. The Behavior Clinic, a special division for administrative purposes, which was an autonomous agency assisting the Criminal Court to determine the sanity of defendants.

 

Further information on public aid in Illinois and on the various agencies administering it may be found in the following sources, all of which were consulted in compiling the preceding data: Annual Reports of the Cook County Department of Public Aid (and its predecessors), 1946-1966, and of the Cook County Board of Commissioners, 1941-1945; Illinois Blue Books, 1941-1967; Social Service Directories published by the Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago; A History of Public Assistance in Illinois, reprinted from New Horizons in Public Assistance in Illinois, June 1959; and the Cook County Department of Public Aid's Chronology of Action and Events Affecting Public Aid Programs in Illinois, October 1930-June 1967.

 

Summary description of the collection:

Correspondence, reports, speeches, minutes, news clipping scrapbooks, and other files relating primarily to Raymond Hilliard's career in public welfare administration in New York City and Chicago, Cook County, Illinois. Early files, ca. 1934-1948, relate to the Illinois Emergency Relief Commission and the Illinois Public Aid Commission, unemployment relief during the Great Depression, and welfare assistance throughout the state, including southern Illinois. Collection includes files (5 ft.) relating to Hilliard's work as commissioner of the New York City Department of Welfare, 1948-1951, and as executive of the Welfare and Health Council of New York City, 1951-1953, and on Hilliard's efforts to eliminate Communist influence in the department and improve welfare administration. Collection includes files, ca. 50 ft., primarily 1940s-1963, from Hilliard's work with the Cook County (Ill.) Department of Welfare, later known as the Department of Public Aid, especially files of the department's directors Joseph L. Moss and Raymond Hilliard, relating to general administration, policies, public relations and 1938-1949 radio scripts; personnel, unions, and anti-Communist concerns; studies of effective budgeting for relief recipients, studies of groups of aid recipients, and reviews of the effectiveness of public aid programs; 1930s unemployed councils; recommendations for welfare legislation; and provision of medical care, child care, and care for the older persons.

 

Other materials in the collection include Hilliard's professional correspondence, ca. 1944-1966, and 12 ft. of newsletters, mimeographed reports and fliers, and some correspondence with social welfare and civil rights leaders and organizations, including the American Public Welfare Association, the Community Fund of Chicago, the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, the National Conference of Christians and Jews, the National Conference on Religion and Race 1963 conference in Chicago and related organizations, and the Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago.

 

Description of some materials related to this collections:

Related materials at Chicago History Museum, Research Center, include photographs of Hilliard and his wife and a package of miscellaneous pamphlets and other library materials relating to Hilliard that are cataloged separately. In addition, photographs and scrapbooks of photographs that came with the Hilliard papers were transferred to the Prints & Photographs Collection.

 

List of abbreviations used in this document:

ADC = Aid to Dependent Children

APWA = American Public Welfare Association

CCAP = Citizens Crusade Against Poverty

CCDPA = Cook County Department of Public Aid (1958- )

and predecessors: CCBPA-Cook County Bureau of Public Welfare (1925-1949)

and the CCDW-Cook County Department of Welfare, 1949-1958.

CCHR = Chicago (Ill.). Commission on Human Relations

CFC = Community Fund of Chicago (worked with the Welfare Council;

merged into United Way of Chicago in 1977)

CFGC = Church Federation of Greater Chicago

CIC = Catholic Inter-Racial Council

FSAA = Family Service Association of America

IERC = Illinois Emergency Relief Commission, 1922-1941

IERC (Federal) = Illinois Emergency Relief Commission (Federal), 1932-1935 or 1936

IPAC = Illinois Public Aid Commission, 1941-1963

IWA = Illinois Welfare Association

NCCIJ = National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice

NCCJ = National Conference of Christians and Jews

NCRR = National Conference on Religion and Race

NCSW = National Conference on Social Welfare, formerly National Conference on Social Work

UCC = United Charities of Chicago

Welfare Council = Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago, 1940s onward,

previously the Chicago Council of Social Agencies, 1919-1940s

merged into United Way of Chicago in 1977)

Welfare and Health Council = Welfare and Health Council of New York City.

 

List of online catalog headings about the collection:

The following headings for this collections were placed in the online catalog.

Subjects:

Hilliard, Raymond M, 1907-1966--Archives.

Moss, Joseph Lincoln--Archives.

Cook County (Ill.). Bureau of Public Welfare--Archives.

Cook County (Ill.). Dept. of Welfare--Archives.

Cook County (Ill.). Dept. of Public Aid--Archives.

Chicago (Ill.). Commission on Human Relations.

Chicago (Ill.). Dept. of Welfare.

Community Council of Greater New York.

Illinois Emergency Relief Commission.

Illinois Public Aid Commission.

New York (N.Y.). Dept. of Welfare.

United Public Workers of America.

Welfare and Health Council of New York City.

Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago.

National Conference on Religion and Race (1963 : Chicago, Ill.)

African Americans--Illinois--Cook County--Social conditions--20th century.

Anti-communist movements--New York (State)--New York--20th century.

Anti-communist movements--Illinois--Chicago--20th century.

Catholics--Illinois--Chicago--20th century.

Catholics--United States--20th century.

Child care services--Illinois--Cook County--20th century.

Communism--Illinois--Chicago--20th century.

Depressions--1929--Illinois.

Medical care--Illinois--Cook County--20th century.

Older people--Illinois--Cook County--20th century.

Public welfare--Illinois--Chicago--20th century.

Public welfare--Illinois--Cook County--20th century.

Public welfare--Illinois--20th century.

Public welfare--New York (State)--New York--20th century.

Radio programs--Illinois--Cook County--20th century.

Social problems--United States--20th century.

Social workers--Illinois--Cook County--20th century.

Social workers--Labor unions--Illinois--Cook County--20th century.

Social workers--Labor unions--New York (State)--New York--20th century.

Social workers--New York (State)--New York--20th century.

Trumbull Park Riots, Chicago, Ill., 1953-1955. (series 3, subseries 3)

Unemployment--Illinois--Cook County--20th century.

Cook County (Ill.)--Social conditions--20th century.

New York (N.Y.)--Social conditions--20th century.

Southern Illinois Region.

 

Form/genre:

Correspondence.

Minutes.

Reports.

Scrapbooks

Scripts.

Speeches.

Statistics.

 

Added entries:

Moss, Joseph Lincoln.

American Public Welfare Association.

Catholic Inter-Racial Council (Chicago, Ill.)

Cook County (Ill.). Bureau of Public Welfare.

Cook County (Ill.). Dept. of Public Aid.

Cook County (Ill.). Dept. of Welfare.

Community Fund of Chicago, inc.

Illinois Emergency Relief Commission.

Illinois Public Aid Commission.

National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice.

National Conference of Christians and Jews.

New York (N.Y.). Dept. of Welfare.

Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago.

National Conference on Religion and Race (1963 : Chicago, Ill.)

 

Arrangement of the collection:

The collection has been divided into 6 series.

Series 1. New York City files, 1948-1953 (box 1-8 & 15 scrapbooks)

Series 2. Cook County Department of Public Aid and predecessor files, 1948-1966 (box 9-115 & 11 scrapbooks) RESTRICTION: In order to consult boxes 9-32, 35, 39-44, 77-110, 114-115, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

Subseries 1. Assistance to older persons, 1923-1967 (11 boxes) RESTRICTION: see above.

Subseries 2. Burials, 1932-1965 (1 box) RESTRICTION: see above.

Subseries 3. Case reviews and reports, 1940-1958 (3 boxes) RESTRICTION: see above.

Subseries 4. Child care, 1925-1966 (9 boxes) RESTRICTION: see above.

Subseries 5. Financial and budgeting files, 1939-1965 (3 boxes) RESTRICTION: see above.

Subseries 6. General administration, 1925-1956 (19 boxes & 11 scrapbooks) RESTRICTION: see above.

Subseries 7. Hilliard professional career files, 1944-Feb. 1967 (16 boxes)

Subseries 8. Housing, 1941-1959 (5 folders)

Subseries 9. Illinois Public Aid Commission and predecessor files, 1934-1963 (4 boxes)

Subseries 10. Laws and legislation, 1935-1962 (2 boxes)

Subseries 11. Medical care, 1926-1966 (14 boxes) RESTRICTION: see above.

Subseries 12 Personnel, 1922-1967 (20 boxes) RESTRICTION: see above.

Subseries 13 Public relations and publicity 1928-1965 (3 boxes)

Subseries 14. Unemployed relief, 1927-1944 (4 folders) RESTRICTION: see above.

Subseries 15. Veterans' relief, 1927-1966 (1 1/2 boxes) RESTRICTION: see above.

Series 3. Social service organizations materials, 1944-1966 (box 116-145)

Subseries 1. American Public Welfare Association files, 1933-1964 (3 1/2 boxes)

Subseries 2. Catholic Inter-Racial Council of Chicago files, 1963-1965 (2 folders)

Subseries 3. Chicago Commission on Human Relations files, 1954-1958 (3 folders)

Subseries 4. Church Federation of Greater Chicago files, 1925-1958 (4 folders)

Subseries 5. Citizens Crusade Against Poverty files, 1964-1966 (2 folders)

Subseries 6. Community Fund of Chicago files, 1933-1964 (6 1/2 boxes)

Subseries 7. Family Service Association of America files, 1930-1957 (4 folders)

Subseries 8. Illinois Welfare Association files, 1943-1962 (3 folders)

Subseries 9. National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice files, 1958-1966 (5 boxes)

Subseries 10. National Conference of Christians and Jews files, 1953-1962 (3 boxes)

Subseries 11. National Conference on Religion and Race files, 1962-1964 (4 folders)

Subseries 12. National Conference on Social Welfare files, 1924-1966 (2 folders)

Subseries 13. United Charities of Chicago files, 1926-1958 (2 folders)

Subseries 14. Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago files, 1922-1962 (6 boxes)

Series 4. Hilliard personalia (box 146 & 1 oversize folder)

Series 5. Confidential files (box 147-152) RESTRICTION: Closed until 2035

Series 6. Items received from Cook County Department of Public Aid, 1968-69 (box 153) RESTRICTION: Closed until 2036

At end of collection: Storage of oversize boxed and unboxed scrapbooks and plaques belonging to Series 1, Series 2, & Series 4.

 

Detailed description of archival series within the collection:

Series 1. New York City files, 1948-1953 (box 1-8 & 15 scrapbooks)

This series includes the correspondence, reports, texts of speeches, and scrapbooks of news clippings relative to Raymond Hilliard's service as Commissioner of the Department of Welfare of New York City (April 1948-Feb. 14, 1951) and as Executive Director of the Welfare and Health Council of New York City (Feb. 1951-June 15, 1953). This series is filed chronologically except for Hilliard's speeches, which are in a separate box, and the scrapbooks, which are stored at the end of the collection. The majority of the items are manuscripts, but smaller amounts of mimeographed and printed papers also present.

 

Series 1 includes Hilliard's personal incoming and outgoing correspondence and speeches. Besides the routine inquiries and personal notes, there are letters (January-April 1949) to Illinois friends, welfare workers, lawyers, and politicians about welfare issues in Illinois, particularly Governor Adlai Stevenson's reorganization of the welfare departments. Hilliard's efforts to eliminate Communist influence in the New York City welfare department are treated in letters of: November 8, 1948; April 26, May 9, July 1949; July 1950; February 14, 1951; and July-September 1951. His efforts to keep the Planned Parenthood organization out of the Welfare and Health Council of New York is mentioned in correspondence from May-June 15, 1953. The typescripts of speeches (April 15, 1948-March 5, 1953) cover many phases of public and private assistance.

 

The printed and mimeographed materials in Series 1 include newspaper articles, financial reports, minutes of the Inter-Association Committee on Health, programs from banquets, administrative directories, appointment books, and American Public Welfare Association materials 1948-1951. (Additional American Public Welfare Association materials may also be found among the agency papers in Series 3 of this collection.) Detailed studies and printed reports of the Department of Welfare, Welfare and Health Council, Inter-Association Committee on Health, Mayor's Committee on Aged, Mayor's Committee on Puerto Rican Affairs, and other governmental and private social service organizations also are present.

 

Series 2. Cook County Department of Public Aid and predecessor files, 1948-1966 (box 9-115 & 11 scrapbooks). RESTRICTION: In order to consult boxes 9-32, 35, 39-44, 77-110, 114-115, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

This series contains papers of agency directors Joseph L. Moss, who served from 1926-1954, and Raymond M. Hilliard, who served from 1954-1966, and papers of various division directors, as well as working files from the Central Administrative Office of the Cook County (Ill.) Department of Public Aid (CCDPA) and its predecessor agencies: the Cook County Bureau of Public Welfare and the Cook County Department of Welfare.

 

The Cook County Bureau of Public Welfare existed from 1925 to 1949; followed by the Cook County Department of Welfare, 1949-1958, and then in 1958, the Cook County Department of Public Aid (CCDPA).

 

The department files date from 1922-1966 (mainly 1948-1958) and include correspondence, minutes of meetings, reports, inter-office memoranda, some printed materials received from local and national welfare organizations, and 6 large scrapbooks (scrapbooks #16-21) containing news clippings about Hilliard's service as director. This series also includes materials regarding Hilliard's service as Executive Secretary of the Illinois Public Aid Commission in the 1940s.

 

Scrapbooks #22-26 contain news clippings regarding Hilliard, public welfare, civil rights, local and state politics, and columns from political, financial and other writers, spanning the years 1959-1966.

 

The majority of the papers are manuscripts with small amounts of printed and mimeographed data included. Most department materials in the collection were directed from the Central Administrative Office to the local district offices. The only papers generated from the local offices concern complaints or requests from local office supervisors.

 

These materials have been organized by major topics. However, information on a particular topic may be found scattered through other files in this collection, and the main files about social service organizations are in Series 3.

 

Series 2 is arranged in 15 subseries, which are described below.

 

Series 2. Subseries 1. Assistance to older persons, 1923-1967 (11 boxes) RESTRICTION: see Series 2 overall description above for box numbers.

Most of the materials on assistance to older persons concern nursing homes: placement of aged aid recipients, licensing and investigations, services, and costs. A smaller lot covers the establishment of recreation programs in the city, medical needs, geriatric rehabilitation, Old Age Pension and Social Security laws, the Friendly Visitor Program, and financial responsibility of relatives for the aged. The manuscripts include inter-office memoranda; Illinois Public Aid Commission bulletins; incoming and outgoing correspondence, much of it with nursing home owners and health officials; reports on investigations of nursing homes and minutes of the CCDPA Advisory Committee on Aging.

 

The printed and mimeographed materials include: reports on medical and health needs of older people; Raymond Hilliard's articles on people with chronic illnesses; minutes of meetings of local community committees on aging; and booklets, fliers and announcements of agency programs for older people. A significant lot of incoming and outgoing correspondence (Oct-Dec. 1956) concerns Hilliard's efforts to bring Dr. Lionel Cosin, a world-famous geriatric rehabilitation specialist, to Chicago, to establish a program in this field at the Oak Forest Infirmary. Many of the papers from 1942-1947 concern Hilliard's service as Executive Secretary of the Illinois Public Aid Commission.

 

Series 2. Subseries 2. Burials, 1932-1965 (1 box) RESTRICTION: see Series 2 overall description above for box numbers.

This lot consists of correspondence, news clippings, and other sundry papers relative to the burial of paupers, military-service veterans, and persons on relief, and also to laws pertaining to morticians.

 

Series 2. Subseries 3. Case reviews and reports, 1940-1958 (3 boxes) RESTRICTION: see Series 2 overall description above for box numbers.

This subseries provides data on fraud investigations, reviews of Aid to Dependent Children cases, rules and regulations governing registration of aid recipients, comments on case recording, and instructions on the use of forms. Papers dealing with investigation of fraud cases and with the reviews of relief recipients consist of Illinois Public Aid Commission bulletins, memoranda, and typewritten and mimeographed reports on the findings of the reviews. Comments on IPAC findings, statistical reports, and memoranda from the CCDPA Central Office also are present.

 

Series 2. Subseries 4. Child care, 1925-1966 (9 boxes) RESTRICTION: see Series 2 overall description above for box numbers.

This subseries pertains to the Aid to Dependent Children Program, handicapped children, foster homes and adoptions, juvenile delinquency, Selective Service, unmarried mothers, Homemaker Service Program, and Social Security benefits for children from deceased or disabled parents. About one-third of this material consists of printed and mimeographed announcements, booklets, and reports from local and national organizations and from the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare. The remaining papers are from the Cook County Department of Public Aid and include: interoffice memoranda; statistical reports; minutes of the Advisory Committee on Homemaker Service, the Advisory Committee on Aid to Dependent Children, and the Advisory Committee on Family Court; routine thank-you letters for contributions to the summer camp fund; incoming and outgoing correspondence with other welfare departments on the administration of their ADC programs; letters to Garrett Keaster, Executive Secretary of the Illinois Public Aid Commission, on revision of welfare rules; and reports on all phases of child care. Most of the letters and memoranda are from Albert J. Neely, Director of the Children's Division of the CCDPA. A few significant Hilliard letters are present. Two important logs of materials cover the establishment of the Homemaker Services (1950-1952) and the Child Welfare Division (Sept. 1954-Mar. 1955).

 

Series 2. Subseries 5. Financial and budgeting files, 1939-1965 (3 boxes) RESTRICTION: In order to consult box 35, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

The financial records are basically concerned with budgeting for relief recipients. (See the "General Administration" and "Personnel" headings in this series for most of the papers dealing with staff salaries and administrative budgets.) The budgeting papers cover room & board costs, food prices, restaurant surveys, insurance rates, financial responsibility of relatives, and plans on setting up budgets. The manuscript portion of the papers includes sample budgets, monthly food & rent cost survey sheets, minutes of conferences with the Chicago Housing Authority, memoranda and reports from the budgeting workshop, drafts of budget-manual chapters, interoffice memoranda commenting on costs, and Hilliard speeches on financing public welfare. The printed and mimeographed papers are IPAC weekly guides for food buying; lists of relatives income scale; booklets on family food budgets; U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare reports on retail food prices by cities; and New York City Department of Welfare materials on budgeting.

 

Series 2. Subseries 6. General administration, 1925-1956 (19 boxes) RESTRICTION: In order to consult boxes 39-44, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

These materials concern the policies and operations of the Central Administrative Office and the district offices of the Cook County Department of Public Aid and its predecessors. Related materials from local welfare organization and Cook County and Illinois state agencies also are present. The papers include incoming and outgoing correspondence, interoffice memoranda, reports, surveys, printed announcements and pamphlets, minutes of office meetings.

 

The papers relative to policies on aid to relief recipients concern burials, approval for budget items, conservators for people judged to be mentally incompetents, emergency checks, veterans' benefits, unemployment compensation, and food and nutritional needs. Operational records of the CCDPA offices include materials on the reorganization of the Central and district Offices; district office reports; office leases and supplies; forms; publication distribution; the CCDPA Advisory Committee; and the A. C. Nielsen and George Fry surveys on departmental procedures on relief.

 

Cook County and state agency materials are from the Behavior Clinic of the Criminal Court, Family Court, Court of Domestic Relations, Cook County Treasurer's and Sheriff's Offices, the Chicago Board of Education, and the Illinois Commission on Human Relations. Local social service organizations represented include: the American Red Cross, American Legion, Catholic Charities, Chicago City Club, Chicago Credit Bureau, Chicago Urban League, Henry Booth House, Jewish Federation of Chicago, Jewish Vocational Service, Illinois Federation of Women's Clubs, Populations Research and Training Center, Randall House, Salvation Army, Traveler's Aid Society, and many others.

 

Significant materials in this series include letters of Dr. William H. Haines of the Behavior Clinic (1954-1958), the A. C. Nielsen Survey of the ADC Program (June-July 1951) and the George Fry Survey of revision of departmental working procedures (Jan-Mar. 1950).

 

Series 2. Subseries 7. Hilliard professional career files, 1944-Feb. 1967 (16 boxes & 11 scrapbooks)

This subseries is comprised of incoming and outgoing correspondence, speeches, invitations, and printed materials received by Hilliard as a leader in the field of public welfare administration and 6 large scrapbooks of news clippings (scrapbooks #16-21) about Hilliard's service as director of CCDPA.

 

Scrapbooks #22-26 contain news clippings regarding Hilliard, public welfare, civil rights, local and state politics, and columns from political, financial and other writers, spanning the years 1959-1966. [All scrapbooks are shelved at the end of the collection. Please specify this when requesting materials.]

 

The bulk of the material is routine correspondence with lawyers, congressmen, welfare administrators, and others working in the field of public welfare. Letters by Hilliard provide a detailed explanation of his opinions on federal aid to migrants (Jan.-June 1958), the merger of the Cook County Department of Public Aid and the Chicago Department of Welfare (July-Dec. 1957), and the reorganization of welfare systems in other states (Dec. 1956).

 

Papers from 1944-1948 are primarily speeches and printed articles by Hilliard as Executive Secretary of the IPAC. The materials from 1958 through 1966 are a miscellaneous lot, including items relative to Hilliard's study-tour of the Southern Appalachia area, particularly Kentucky and Tennessee, during the summer 1959; and items concerning Hilliard's participation in the planning session for the White House Conference: "To Fulfill These Rights" (Oct. 1965-June 1966). A small amount of Hilliard biographical information also is included.

 

There are only a few items involving friends and family in this series. Most of Hilliard's family correspondence is in Series 4 (Personalia) of this collection, with a few personal notes scattered throughout Series 1 (New York City files).

 

Series 2. Subseries 8. Housing, 1941-1959 (5 folders)

This series contains papers on relief recipients in public housing projects, apartment rental surveys, slum clearance, and urban renewal. Almost all of the materials involve the Chicago Housing Authority and their handling of rental payments by relief recipients in CHA projects, and damages to furniture and apartments. The papers include incoming and outgoing correspondence with the CHA, minutes of conferences between the CHA and the Cook County Department of Public Aid, surveys of rentals, newspaper articles on slum renewal, memoranda on excessive rentals, and reports on training projects and facilities in housing projects.

 

Series 2. Subseries 9. Illinois Public Aid Commission and predecessor files, 1934-1963 (4 boxes)

The majority of this subseries concern IPAC rules and regulations on welfare, fraud investigations, and case reviews, CCDPA budgets, and state and federal welfare laws. A small amount of material relates to the Illinois Emergency Relief Commission, the predecessor to the IPAC. Papers from 1942-1947 cover Hilliard's term as Executive Secretary of the commission.

 

This subseries includes Raymond Hilliard's letters to IPAC Executive Secretary Garrett Keaster commenting on proposed rules; a chronology of events in welfare in Illinois since 1930; memoranda on the implementation of IPAC rules; reports on case reviews and appeals; summaries of legislation affecting welfare; and three appointment books (1945-1947) kept by Hilliard on IPAC rules and regulations.

 

Series 2. Subseries 10. Laws and legislation, 1935-1962 (2 boxes)

These papers concern state and federal public welfare laws, primarily 1949-1958, with most of the materials relevant to reciprocal state support laws, Illinois laws on financial responsibility of relatives, residence requirements for eligibility for aid, and social security amendments. Most of the materials are printed and mimeographed copies of federal and state bills and laws, lists of Illinois courts having jurisdiction under uniform support laws, statements by the Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago on residence laws, and U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare reports on social services. The remaining papers include many reports by the Illinois Public Aid Commission and the Cook County Department of Public Aid on proposed changes in welfare laws; incoming and outgoing correspondence on welfare bills; memoranda on residence and uniform support laws.

 

Series 2. Subseries 11. Medical care, 1926-1966 (14 boxes) RESTRICTION: see Series 2 overall description above for box numbers.

These materials are concerned with the administration of the medical care program for relief recipients and with the illnesses and disabilities most frequently treated in that program. Many of the administrative papers are correspondence and memoranda between Cook County Hospital, the Illinois Public Aid Commission, and the Cook County Department of Public Aid on the establishment of fees at Cook County Hospital, and the IPAC's payment of these fees. Correspondence, memoranda, and reports also concern: doctor, dentist, and prescription drug services and bills; people who were medically indigent; the maternity ward crisis in Chicago during 1954; the polio vaccination program for the children of relief recipients (Jan-June 1956); adjustment training for people who were blind; and the Home Care and Emergency Clinic programs. The lot of manuscript and printed materials on illnesses includes correspondence, memoranda, reports, and articles on chronic illness, blindness, tuberculosis, alcoholism, and drug addiction.

 

Series 2. Subseries 12 Personnel, 1922-1967 (20 boxes) RESTRICTION: see Series 2 overall description above for box numbers.

Personnel materials concern the Central Administrative Office's policies on and administration of staff development, efficiency evaluation, promotions, salaries, vacations, and attendance at welfare conferences; plus materials relative to employee unions. The papers include Raymond M. Hilliard's correspondence with the Illinois Public Aid Commission on wage increases for professional and clerical workers; minutes of meetings of the Staff Development Committee; lists of attendance at welfare conferences and graduate courses in social work; and reports of meetings with the union grievance committee. Printed and mimeographed materials include newsletters and handbills of the Public and Social Service Employees Union; lists of workers eligible for civil service promotion examinations; materials from the American Public Welfare Association and the Joint Negro Appeal; and the department's Manual on Personnel.

 

Papers from 1930-1934 concern the formation of a union by Chicago social workers, with items during 1933-1934 containing information on social workers who were alleged to be Communists. The accusation of Communist influence also is treated in items from March 1951 through March 1953 relative to charges by the American Legion of Illinois that the United Public Workers of America generally followed a Communist line and that members of this union were employed by the Cook County Department of Public Aid.

 

Series 2. Subseries 13 Public relations and publicity 1928-1965 (3 boxes)

These materials include scripts of CCDPA and its predecessor's radio broadcasts, 1938-1949; general correspondence with the public and with welfare administrators on CCDPA relief programs; correspondence with the Chicago Tribune's Good Fellow Department about Christmas gifts for ADC children; and printed announcements from the Welfare Public Relations Council of Greater Chicago.

 

Series 2. Subseries 14. Unemployed relief, 1927-1944 (4 folders) RESTRICTION: see Series 2 overall description above for box numbers.

The bulk of this lot of correspondence, news clippings and printed items is from the 1930s and concerns demands of people seeking relief assistance and to demonstrations at various relief stations. These papers frequently pertain to organizations, some of them Socialist or Communist, which represented unemployed people, among them: the Unemployed Councils of Chicago, the Chicago Workers' Committee on Unemployment, the Workers League of America, the Unemployed Workers League, and the Young Communist League.

 

Series 2. Subseries 15. Veterans' relief, 1927-1966 (1 1/2 boxes) RESTRICTION: see Series 2 overall description above for box numbers.

This lot consists of correspondence, clippings, financial records, etc. relative to relief offered veterans under the Bogardus Act; to claims by Spanish-American War veterans and to claims by veterans of World War I and/or World War II. Papers from Jan. 1933 through Apr. 1935 relate to an investigation of fraudulent relief orders issued by the Veterans Bureau.

 

Series 3. Social service organizations materials, 1944-1966 (box 116-145)

This series consists of groups of newsletters, minutes of meetings, reports, fliers, and small amounts of correspondence and from national and local social welfare and civil rights organizations to which either Raymond Hilliard or the Cook County Department of Public Aid had ongoing relationships. Most of the papers are mimeographed or printed.

 

Series 3 had 14 subseries arranged alphabetically by organization. Scattered materials from similar organizations also are present in Series 2 of this collection.

 

Series 3. Subseries 1. American Public Welfare Association files, 1933-1964 (3 1/2 boxes)

The American Public Welfare Association (APWA) has served as a forum for public welfare administrators to air public welfare problems and proposed solutions. APWA membership included the Cook County Department of Public Aid and many of its social workers, with Raymond Hilliard serving on both national and regional advisory committees of the APWA. While in New York City, Hilliard served on the APWA board of directors, an alternate to its Inter-association Committee on Health, and on the committees on Aging and Medical Care. When Hilliard became director of the Cook County Department of Public Aid in 1954, he resigned from all APWA committees except the one on Aging. He later served on the National Awards Committee, acted as an advisor for regional round table discussions, and was a guest speaker at regional and national meetings of the APWA.

 

Most of the papers are mimeographed articles, reports, pamphlets, committee and board meeting minutes, financial reports, memoranda, speeches, and drafts of statements of principle on social welfare matters. A small lot of correspondence is routine notification of meetings and personal greetings to and from Hilliard, although some of the letters pertain to the inside workings of the APWA. (Additional APWA papers are in Series 1 of this collection.)

 

Series 3. Subseries 2. Catholic Inter-Racial Council of Chicago files, 1963-1965 (2 folders)

The Catholic Inter-Racial Council was an organization run by Catholic laymen that worked through educational and service programs for equal opportunity in the Catholic and general communities. Hilliard was a member of the council and also served on its board of directors. Local CICs financially supported and worked with the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, of which Hilliard was chairman. Materials in this series include reports, minutes of meetings, letters to council members, and financial statements. Materials concern integration problems in the Archdiocese of Chicago and in Chicago more generally. (For related materials, see also Series 3. Subseries 9. National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice.)

 

Series 3. Subseries 3. Chicago Commission on Human Relations files, 1954-1958 (3 folders)

The Chicago Commission on Human Relations was a government agency established by the Mayor of Chicago to combat discrimination in all aspects of urban living. Raymond Hilliard served as an advisor to the commission's subcommittee on public service and an advisor to the Committee on New Residents. This subseries includes minutes and reports from these two committees, including reports on the Trumbull Park Homes racial riots.

 

Series 3. Subseries 4. Church Federation of Greater Chicago files, 1925-1958 (4 folders)

This subseries involves the Church Federation of Greater Chicago's Department of Social Welfare, the Boys' Court Service Committee, and the several CCDPA administrative assistants who served them as advisors. Some correspondence is present, but most of the items are mimeographed copies of minutes of committee meetings, questionnaires, reports on delinquency, and recommendations on state welfare legislation.

 

Series 3. Subseries 5. Citizens Crusade Against Poverty files, 1964-1966 (2 folders)

The Citizens Crusade Against Poverty (CCAP) was a national non-partisan coalition of organizations and individuals working to elimination of poverty. As chairman of the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, Hilliard was invited to join the National Committee of the CCAP. The papers include minutes of meetings, drafts of the CCAP constitution, newsletters, newspaper press releases, materials from committees, reports on delinquency, and recommendations on legislation. (For related materials, see also: Series 3. Subseries 9. National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice.)

 

Series 3. Subseries 6. Community Fund of Chicago files, 1933-1964 (6 1/2 boxes)

The Community Fund of Chicago was the united fund-raising organization providing financing to approximately 140 non-profit health and welfare organizations in the Chicago metropolitan area through the Welfare Council. Although the Cook County Department of Public Aid received no Community Fund donations directly, the CCDPA advised on welfare costs and services. Raymond Hilliard was a member of the budget committee of the Community Fund from 1954-1957, after which an administrative assistant in the CCDPA took his position. The vast majority of the papers in this subseries concern the work of the budget committee, and include reports on the costs of medical care, budget policies, requests from agencies for supplemental funds, statements on the minimum needs of the agencies, and minutes of committee meetings.

 

Of especial importance are the resource folders published by the budget committee and the reports of the reviewing subcommittees. The resource folders (1951-1957) give information on the joint efforts of the Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago and the Community Fund in assessing agency needs, provide detailed budgets for each agency, and set staff policies in reviewing budget requests. The reviewing committees provide the budget committee with a detailed analysis of each agency. The reviewing committees' reports explain how each agency is set up and operates; and evaluates its strengths and weaknesses, its needs for the coming year, and its financial basis and budget. The agencies are reviewed in groups by the appropriate committee.

 

The Welfare Council was founded in 1914 as the Chicago Central Council of Social Agencies; incorporated in 1919 as the Chicago Council of Social Agencies, and became the Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago in the 1940s. In 1971 it was renamed the Council of Community Services; and in 1977 merged with the Community Fund of Chicago to become the United Way of Chicago.

 

Series 3. Subseries 7 Family Service Association of America files, 1930-1957 (4 folders)

The Family Service Association of America promoted and publicized family welfare and guidance services throughout the country. The Cook County Department of Public Aid maintained an agency membership in the FSA until 1957, when Raymond Hilliard withdrew the department from membership on the grounds that the FSA's services pertained to private voluntary agencies rather than to public agencies. The papers contain conference minutes, meeting agendas, newsletters on legislation, materials for National Family Week, and reports on family service in Chicago and the nation.

 

Series 3. Subseries 8. Illinois Welfare Association files, 1943-1962 (3 folders)

The Illinois Welfare Association advised on and publicized the work of the public aid departments of counties within the state of Illinois. The Cook County Department of Public Aid often acted as host to IWA annual meetings while Raymond Hilliard held various offices in the association. Most of these materials are letters, memoranda, news releases, programs, and reports relative to the coordination and operation of IPWA conferences. Lists of officers and directors, district meeting minutes, an officers manual, and letters from the awards committee are also present.

 

Series 3. Subseries 9. National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice files, 1958-1966 (5 boxes)

The National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice (NCCIJ) publicizes and operates national programs, although most of its work is carried on by local Catholic Interracial Councils, churches, and other civil rights groups. In 1962, Raymond Hilliard became chairman of the NCCIJ and remained in that post until his death in July 1966. The routine NCCIJ materials include minutes and notifications of meetings, appeals for donations, newsletters, financial statements, reprints of magazine articles on integration, and copies of Executive Director Mathew Ahmann's letters. There are significant logs of incoming and outgoing correspondence dealing with racial problems in the South in 1963, President Kennedy's civil rights stance, the riots in the Watts area of Los Angeles during August 1965, and the attempt on James Meredith's life in Mississippi in June 1966.

 

The reports of the NCCIJ's Southern Field Service detail the problems of integrating parochial schools in New Orleans (La.) in August 1962 and in other Southern dioceses. The Southern Field Service reports describe Catholic Church efforts at integration in various cities and contain data on bishops' support of and objections to NCCIJ work. Other NCCIJ projects included the Cabrini Project, a summer pilot program for remedial and enrichment education in a Chicago ghetto; and efforts to use the church's buying power to promote equal employment opportunity policies among businesses. Booklets put out by the NCCIJ pertain to the training of priests in race relations matters, program work in Black ghettos, and other racial problems.

 

Series 3. Subseries 10. National Conference of Christians and Jews files, 1953-1962 (3 boxes)

Hilliard was a leader of the National Conference of Christians and Jews (NCCJ). In New York City, Hilliard was co-chairman of the board of directors of the Manhattan-Westchester Region Council of the NCCJ; and in Chicago, he was elected to the board of directors of the Chicago Region NCCJ, and served as a member of the budget committee, chairman of the National Commission of Community Organizations (1955-1959), member of the National Awards Committee, and chairman of Brotherhood Week in 1962. These materials include minutes and reports from council and committee meetings, financial statements, reports from different councils across the country on brotherhood projects, lists of award nominees, programs form the Vassar Summer Institute, and correspondence with friends on problems within the NCCJ.

 

Series 3. Subseries 11. National Conference on Religion and Race files, 1962-1964 (4 folders)

The NCCR was convened in 1962 by the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations of the National Council of Churches, the Social Action Commission of the Synagogue Council of America, and the Social Action Department of the National Catholic Welfare Conference to combat the evils of prejudice, discrimination and segregation and to hasten the advent of full racial justice for all. Raymond M. Hilliard served as a member of the Chicago Host Committee for the NCCR. These materials consist of newsletters, minutes, correspondence and other items relating to the creation of conference and to meetings sponsored by it, particularly the first NCRR conference, which was held in Chicago during January 1963. a few items from the Chicago Conference on Religion and Race are also present in this lot.

 

Series 3. Subseries 12. National Conference on Social Welfare files, 1924-1966 (2 folders)

The National Conference on Social Welfare (formerly known as the National Conference on Social Work), an organization of professional and lay persons and local, state and national agencies interested in social welfare, was founded in 1874. The director and various staff members of the Cook County Department of Public Aid have been members of the NCSW. The NCSW conducts annual forums to study basic social welfare problems and issues. This lot of materials consists of programs, speeches, sundry printed items, and some correspondence relative to these forums.

 

Series 3. Subseries 13. United Charities of Chicago files, 1926-1958 (2 folders)

The United Charities of Chicago is a non-sectarian welfare organization that specializes in helping families in distress. The United Charities works closely with the Cook County Department of Public Aid (CCDPA) and refers many of its cases to the department. All of the materials in this lot are from the Legal Aid Bureau of the United Charities of Chicago. The correspondence with the CCDPA concerns Illinois laws and their application to aid cases, lost relief-recipient checks, and policies of the United Charities. Other materials include minutes of board meetings, admission acceptance policies, statements on divorce policies, conference materials, and routine mailings.

 

Series 3. Subseries 14. Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago files, 1922-1962 (6 boxes)

The Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago (formerly known as the Council of Social Agencies of Chicago) is an association of public and private welfare organizations, which plans and coordinates welfare services to avoid duplication of effort and service, and to discover unmet community needs. This lot of papers mainly concerns the Welfare Council's Social Service Exchange, which maintains a confidential index of case records of member agencies; and the council's volunteer bureau, which recruits and refers volunteer workers to health and welfare agencies. The Cook County Department of Public Aid worked with the Welfare Council in planning services; used the council's Social Service Exchange; and employed the Volunteer Bureau to recruit worker for its Friendly Visitor Program, in which volunteers pay social visits to old age relief recipients. (See the materials under the "Older people" heading in Series 2 of these papers for related data.

 

The Social Service Exchange items include correspondence with the Exchange and with welfare departments in other cities; minutes of the Advisory Committee on the Exchange; and reports on minimum standards of and use of the Exchange. The Volunteer Bureau materials provide letters to volunteers, Advisory Committee minutes, reports on new projects, and data on the selection of the Mother of the Year. A few general Welfare Council items are also present.

 

Series 4. Hilliard personalia (box 146 & 1 oversize folder & plaques)

This series is filed chronologically and contains miscellaneous personal papers, correspondence of Raymond M. Hilliard with his family and friends, 1948-1953; business correspondence relative to setting up his New York City apartment, 1948-1949; dinner programs, menus and admission tickets to affairs attended by Hilliard and his family; 42 issues of the Notre Dame Alumnus, 1948-1963; and citations and awards given to Hilliard by various organizations (some of these are in the form of plaques).

 

The oversize folder is stored separately; when requesting it, please specify it clearly.

 

Some plaques are stored in the large box and wrapped packages that are shelved at the end of the collection. When requesting this material, please specify it according to the information at the end of the section named: "List of contents of the collection."

 

Series 5. Confidential files (box 147-152) RESTRICTION: Closed until 2035

This series is comprised of papers removed from Series 2 and Series 3 because relief recipients are named in them. The papers include correspondence, case histories and records, and various lists.

 

Series 5 contains materials taken from the following categories in Series 2 of the papers: (1) Assistance to older persons: 8 folders; (2) Case records and reviews: 4 folders; (3) Child care: 4 folders; (4) Financial records: 2 folders; (5) General administration: 4 folders; (6) Hilliard personal papers: 1 folder; (7) Housing: 1 folder; (8) Illinois Public Aid Commission: 2 folders; (9) Laws and legislation: 1 folder; (10) Medical care: 6 folders; (11) Personnel: 1 folder; (12) Public relations and publicity: 2 folders; (13) Veterans' relief: 1 folder. One folder was removed from Series 3 of the papers and placed in this confidential classification.

 

Series 6. Items received from Cook County Department of Public Aid, 1968-69 (box 153) RESTRICTION: Closed until 2036.

 

 

List of contents of the collection:

Series 1. New York City files, 1948-1953 (box 1-8 & 15 scrapbooks) [scrapbooks are shelved at end of collection]

box 1 New York City speeches, Apr. 1948-Mar. 1953

 

box 2 New York City files, Oct. 1947-Dec. 1948

 

box 3 New York City files, Jan-Nov. 1949

 

box 4 New York City files, Dec. 1949-June 1950

 

box 5 New York City files, July-Dec. 1950

 

box 6 New York City files, Jan-Aug. 1951

 

box 7 New York City files, Sept. 1951-July 1953

 

box 8 New York City files, Aug. 1953-1955 & undated

 

Series 2. Cook County Department of Public Aid and predecessor files, 1948-1966 (box 9-108 & 11 scrapbooks) [scrapbooks are shelved at end of collection]

Subseries 1. Assistance to older persons, 1923-1967 (box 9-19):

RESTRICTION: In order to consult boxes 9-32, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

box 9 Files on assistance for older persons, 1923-1937

 

box 10 Files on assistance for older persons, 1938-1943

 

box 11 Files on assistance for older persons, 1944-1946

 

box 12 Files on assistance for older persons, 1947-1948

 

box 13 Files on assistance for older persons, 1949-Mar. 1951

 

box 14 Files on assistance for older persons, Apr. 1951-1953

 

box 15 Files on assistance for older persons, 1954

 

box 16 Files on assistance for older persons, 1955-June 1957

 

box 17 Files on assistance for older persons, July 1956-1957

 

box 18 Files on assistance for older persons, 1948-1949

 

box 19 Files on assistance for older persons, 1960-1967

 

Series 2. Cook County Department of Public Aid and predecessor files, 1948-1966 - continued

Subseries 2. Burials, 1932-1965 (box 20):

RESTRICTION: In order to consult boxes 9-32, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

box 20 Burial assistance files, 1932-1965

 

Series 2. Cook County Department of Public Aid and predecessor files, 1948-1966 - continued

Subseries 3. Case reviews and reports, 1940-1958 (box 21-23):

RESTRICTION: In order to consult boxes 9-32, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

box 21 Case records and reviews, 1940-1949

 

box 22 Case records and reviews, 1950-1952

 

box 23 Case records and reviews, 1953-1958

 

Series 2. Cook County Department of Public Aid and predecessor files, 1948-1966 - continued

Subseries 4. Child care, 1925-1966 (box 24-32):

RESTRICTION: In order to consult boxes 9-32, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

box 24 Files about child care, 1925-1942

 

box 25 Files about child care, 1943-1946

 

box 26 Files about child care, 1947-1948

 

box 27 Files about child care, 1949-Aug. 1951

 

box 28 Files about child care, Sept. 1951-Apr. 1954

 

box 29 Files about child care, May 1954-Sept. 1955

 

box 30 Files about child care, Oct. 1955-Sept. 1956

 

box 31 Files about child care, Oct-Sept. 1956

 

box 32 Files about child care, Oct. 1958-1966

 

Series 2. Cook County Department of Public Aid and predecessor files, 1948-1966 - continued

Subseries 5. Financial and budgeting files, 1939-1965 (box 33-35):

box 33 Financial records, 1939-Mar. 1953

 

box 34 Financial records, Apr. 1953-1957

 

box 35 Financial records, 1958-1965 RESTRICTION: In order to consult box 35, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

 

Series 2. Cook County Department of Public Aid and predecessor files, 1948-1966 - continued

Subseries 6. General administration, 1925-1956 (box 36-54):

box 36 General administration, 1925-1939

 

box 37 General administration, 1940-Sept. 1943

 

box 38 General administration, Oct. 1943-Apr. 1946

 

box 39 General administration, May 1946-Aug. 1947 RESTRICTION: In order to consult box 39-44, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

 

box 40 General administration, Sept. 1947-1948 RESTRICTION: In order to consult box 39-44, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

 

box 41 General administration, Jan-Nov. 1949 RESTRICTION: In order to consult box 39-44, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

 

box 42 General administration, Dec. 1949-Aug. 1950 RESTRICTION: In order to consult box 39-44, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

 

box 43 General administration, Sept. 1950-Oct. 1951 RESTRICTION: In order to consult box 39-44, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

 

box 44 General administration, Nov. 1951-July 1952 RESTRICTION: In order to consult box 39-44, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

 

box 45 General administration, Aug. 1952-Feb. 1953

 

box 46 General administration, Mar-Oct. 1953

 

box 47 General administration, Nov. 1953-May 1954

 

box 48 General administration, June-Dec. 1954

 

box 49 General administration, Jan-July 1955

 

box 50 General administration, Aug. 1955-Mar. 1956

 

box 51 General administration, Apr-Dec. 1956

 

box 52 General administration, 1957

 

box 53 General administration, 1958

 

box 54 General administration, 1959-1966 & undated

 

Series 2. Cook County Department of Public Aid and predecessor files, 1948-1966 - continued

Subseries 7. Hilliard professional career papers, 1944-Feb. 1967 (box 55-70 & 11 scrapbooks): [scrapbooks are shelved at end of collection]

box 55 Hilliard professional career papers, 1944-1955

 

box 56 Hilliard professional career papers, Jan. 1956-June 1958

 

box 57 Hilliard professional career papers, July 1948-Dec. 1959

 

box 58 Hilliard professional career papers, 1960

 

box 59 Hilliard professional career papers, Jan-Nov. 1961

 

box 60 Hilliard professional career papers, Dec. 1961-June 1962

 

box 61 Hilliard professional career papers, July-Oct. 1962

 

box 62 Hilliard professional career papers, Nov. 1962-May 1963

 

box 63 Hilliard professional career papers, June-Dec. 1963

 

box 64 Hilliard professional career papers, Jan-Apr. 1964

 

box 65 Hilliard professional career papers, May-July 1964

 

box 66 Hilliard professional career papers, Aug-Dec. 1964

 

box 67 Hilliard professional career papers, Jan-May 1965

 

box 68 Hilliard professional career papers, June-Oct. 1965

 

box 69 Hilliard professional career papers, Nov. 1965-Jan. 1966

 

box 70 Hilliard professional career papers, Feb. 1966-Feb. 1967

 

Scrapbooks #16-26 (news clippings, 1954-1966) belonging to Series 2 are stored at the end of the collection

 

Series 2. Cook County Department of Public Aid and predecessor files, 1948-1966 - continued

Subseries 8. Housing, 1941-1959 (box 71 folders 1-5):

box 71

folders:

1-5 Housing 1941-1959

 

Series 2. Cook County Department of Public Aid and predecessor files, 1948-1966 - continued

Subseries 9. Illinois Public Aid Commission and predecessor files, 1934-1963 (box 71-74):

box 71 - continued

folders:

6-7 Files on Illinois Public Aid Commission, 1934-1944

 

box 72 Files on Illinois Public Aid Commission, 1943-1948

 

box 73 Files on Illinois Public Aid Commission, 1949-1953

 

box 74 Files on Illinois Public Aid Commission, 1954-1963

 

Series 2. Cook County Department of Public Aid and predecessor files, 1948-1966 - continued

Subseries 10. Laws and legislation, 1935-1962 (box 75-76):

box 75 Laws and legislation, 1935-1955

 

box 76 Laws and legislation, 1956-1962 & undated

 

Series 2. Cook County Department of Public Aid and predecessor files, 1948-1966 - continued

Subseries 11. Medical care, 1926-1966 (box 77-90):

RESTRICTION: In order to consult boxes 77-110, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

box 77 Medical care, 1926-1941

 

box 78 Medical care, Jan. 1943-May 1944

 

box 79 Medical care, Jan. 1942-May 1944

 

box 80 Medical care, Aug. 1946-Oct. 1948

 

box 81 Medical care, Nov. 1948-Apr. 1950

 

box 82 Medical care, May 1950-Nov. 1951

 

box 83 Medical care, Dec. 1951-Dec. 1952

 

box 84 Medical care, Jan. 1953-Apr. 1954

 

box 85 Medical care, May 1954-July 1955

 

box 86 Medical care, Aug. 1955-Sept. 1956

 

box 87 Medical care, Oct. 1956-Dec. 1957

 

box 88 Medical care, 1958-1959

 

box 89 Medical care, 1960-1963

 

box 90 Medical care, 1964-1966 & undated

 

Series 2. Cook County Department of Public Aid and predecessor files, 1948-1966 - continued

Subseries 12. Personnel, 1922-1967 (box 91-110):

RESTRICTION: In order to consult boxes 77-110, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

box 91 Files about personnel, 1922-1936

 

box 92 Files about personnel, Jan. 1937-July 1941

 

box 93 Files about personnel, Aug. 1941-Mar. 1943

 

box 94 Files about personnel, Apr. 1943-Dec. 1945

 

box 95 Files about personnel, Jan. 1946-Aug. 1947

 

box 96 Files about personnel, Sept. 1947-Dec. 1948

 

box 97 Files about personnel, Jan. 1949-Mar. 1950

 

box 98 Files about personnel, Apr. 1950-Mar. 1951

 

box 99 Files about personnel, Apr-Dec. 1951

 

box 100 Files about personnel, Jan-Nov. 1952

 

box 101 Files about personnel, Dec. 1952-Oct. 1953

 

box 102 Files about personnel, Nov. 1953-July 1954

 

box 103 Files about personnel, Aug. 1954-Apr. 1955

 

box 104 Files about personnel, May-Dec. 1955

 

box 105 Files about personnel, Jan-July 1956

 

box 106 Files about personnel, Aug. 1956-June 1957

 

box 107 Files about personnel, July 1957-June 1958

 

box 108 Files about personnel, July 1958-Dec. 1959

 

box 109 Files about personnel, Jan. 1960-July 1962

 

box 110 Files about personnel, Aug. 1962-1967 & undated

 

Series 2. Cook County Department of Public Aid and predecessor files, 1948-1966 - continued

Subseries 13. Public relations and publicity 1928-1965 (box 111-113):

box 111 Public relations and publicity, 1928-1952

 

box 112 Public relations and publicity, 1953-1956

 

box 113 Public relations and publicity, 1957-1965

 

Series 2. Cook County Department of Public Aid and predecessor files, 1948-1966 - continued

Subseries 14. Unemployed relief, 1927-1944 (box 114 folder 1-4):

RESTRICTION: In order to consult boxes 114-115, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

box 114

folders:

1-4 Unemployed relief, 1927-1954

 

Series 2. Cook County Department of Public Aid and predecessor files, 1948-1966 - continued

Subseries 15. Veterans' relief, 1927-1966 (box 114-115):

RESTRICTION: In order to consult boxes 114-115, researchers must sign the Chicago History Museum's "Request for Research Access to Confidential Materials" form.

box 114 - continued

folders:

5-8 Veteran's relief, 1927-1933

 

box 115 Veteran's relief, 1934-1966

 

Series 3. Social service organizations materials, 1944-1966 (box 116-145)

Subseries 1. American Public Welfare Association files, 1933-1964 (box 116-119):

box 116 American Public Welfare Association, 1933-Nov. 1951

 

box 117 American Public Welfare Association, Dec. 1951-Dec. 1954

 

box 118 American Public Welfare Association, Jan. 1955-Apr. 1958

 

box 119

folders:

1-5 American Public Welfare Association, May 1958-Mar. 1964

 

Series 3. Social service organizations materials, 1944-1966 - continued

Subseries 2. Catholic Inter-Racial Council of Chicago files, 1963-1965 (box 119-120):

box 119 - continued

folders:

6 Catholic Interracial Council, 1963-1964

 

box 120

folders:

1 Catholic Interracial Council, 1965

 

Series 3. Social service organizations materials, 1944-1966 - continued

Subseries 3. Chicago Commission on Human Relations files, 1954-1958 (box 120):

box 120 - continued

folders:

2-4 Chicago Commission on Human Relations, 1954-1958

 

Series 3. Social service organizations materials, 1944-1966 - continued

Subseries 4. Church Federation of Greater Chicago files, 1925-1958 (box 120-121):

box 120 - continued

folders:

5-6 Church Federation of Greater Chicago, 1925-1951

 

box 121

folders:

1-2 Church Federation of Greater Chicago, 1952-1958

 

Series 3. Social service organizations materials, 1944-1966 - continued

Subseries 5. Citizens Crusade Against Poverty files, 1964-1966 (box 121):

box 121 - continued

folders:

3-4 Citizens Crusade Against Poverty, 1964-1966

 

Series 3. Social service organizations materials, 1944-1966 - continued

Subseries 6. Community Fund of Chicago files, 1933-1964 (box 122-128):

box 122 Community Fund of Chicago, 1933-1949

 

box 123 Community Fund of Chicago, 1950-1951

 

box 124 Community Fund of Chicago, Jan. 1952-June 1955

 

box 125 Community Fund of Chicago, July 1955-Feb. 1956

 

box 126 Community Fund of Chicago, Mar-Dec. 1956

 

box 127 Community Fund of Chicago, 1957

 

box 128

folders:

1 Community Fund of Chicago, 1958-1964

 

Series 3. Social service organizations materials, 1944-1966 - continued

Subseries 7 Family Service Association of America files, 1930-1957 (box 128):

box 128 - continued

folders:

2-5 Family Service Association, 1930-1957

 

Series 3. Social service organizations materials, 1944-1966 - continued

Subseries 8. Illinois Welfare Association files, 1943-1962 (box 129):

box 129 Illinois Welfare Association, 1943-1962

 

Series 3. Social service organizations materials, 1944-1966 - continued

Subseries 9. National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice files, 1958-1966 (box 130-134):

box 130 National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, Jan. 1958-June 1963

 

box 131 National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, July 1963-Aug. 1964

 

box 132 National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, Sept. 1964-Jun3 1965

 

box 133 National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, July-Dec. 1965

 

box 134 National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, 1966

 

Series 3. Social service organizations materials, 1944-1966 - continued

Subseries 10. National Conference of Christians and Jews files, 1953-1962 (box 135-138):

box 135 National Conference of Christians and Jews, 1953-1955

 

box 136 National Conference of Christians and Jews, 1956-1957

 

box 137 National Conference of Christians and Jews, June 1957-Dec. 1962

 

box 138

folders:

1-4 National Conference on Religion and Race, 1962-1964

 

Series 3. Social service organizations materials, 1944-1966 - continued

Subseries 12. National Conference on Social Welfare files, 1924-1966 (box 138):

box 138 - continued

folders:

5-6 National Conference on Social Welfare, 1924-1966

 

Series 3. Social service organizations materials, 1944-1966 - continued

Subseries 13. United Charities of Chicago files, 1926-1958 (box 139):

box 139 United Charities of Chicago, 1926-1958

 

Series 3. Social service organizations materials, 1944-1966 - continued

Subseries 14. Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago files, 1922-1962 (box 140-145):

box 140 Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago, 1922-1949

 

box 141 Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago, 1950-1953

 

box 142 Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago, Jan. 1952-Mar. 1956

 

box 143 Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago, Apr. 1956-Nov. 1957

 

box 144 Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago, Dec. 1957-June 15, 1960

 

box 145 Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago, June 16, 1960-1962

 

Series 4. Hilliard personalia (box 146 & 1 oversize folder & 9 plaques).

box 146 Hilliard personalia

 

1 oversize folder (stored separately)

 

Plaques that belong to this series are stored at the end of the collection.

 

Series 5. Confidential files (box 147-152) RESTRICTION: Closed until 2035

box 147 RESTRICTION: Closed until 2035

Aged, 1927-1953

 

box 148 RESTRICTION: Closed until 2035

folders:

1-3 Files on assistance to older persons, 1954-1959

4-5 Case records and reviews, 1942-1965

 

box 149 RESTRICTION: Closed until 2035

folders:

1-2 Case records and reviews, 1953-1958

3-6 Child care, 1942-1965

 

box 150 RESTRICTION: Closed until 2035

folders:

1-2 Financial records, 1946-1958

3-6 General administration, 1932-1948

7 Hilliard professional career papers, 1954-1958

 

box 151 RESTRICTION: Closed until 2035

folders:

1 Housing, 1948-1958

2-3 Illinois Public Aid Commission, 1950-1956

4 Laws and legislation

5-6 Medical care, 1935-1953

 

box 152 RESTRICTION: Closed until 2035

folders:

1-4 Medical care, 1954-1958

5 Personnel

6 Public relations and publicity

7 Veteran's relief

8 From Series 3. Social service organizations (confidential)

 

Series 6. Items received from Cook County Department of Public Aid in 1968-69 (box 153) RESTRICTION: Closed until 2036.

box 153 Correspondence and publications, 1947-1966 RESTRICTION: Closed until 2036.

 

At end of the collection: Storage of oversize boxed and unboxed scrapbooks and plaques belonging to Series 1, Series 2, & Series 4:

box 154 Plaques, etc. described in Series 4 (1 cubic ft. box)

Unboxed scrapbooks described in Series 1 and Series 2:

Scrapbooks #20, 21, 22, 23, 25 [Shelf B0516B]

Scrapbooks #4, 5, 6, 10, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 24, 26 [Shelf B516C]

Scrapbooks #1, 2, 3, 7, 8, 9, 12, 14, 16, 18, four plaques [Shelf B516D]

 

 

Old list of card catalog headings for this collection:

The following headings were made for this collection in the Manuscript Card Catalog:

Subjects:

Aged.

Burial.

Children. Charities, Protection, Etc.

Communism. U.S. 1917.

Housing. Chicago.

Medical Care.

Negroes. Chicago.

New York (City).

Public Welfare.

Public Welfare. Chicago.

Social Service.

Social Service. Chicago.

Veterans.

 

Added entries:

Cook County, (Ill.). Department of Public Aid.

Moss, Joseph Lincoln, 1884-1955.

American Public Welfare Association.

Catholic Interracial Council of Chicago.

Chicago Commission on Human Relations.

Church Federation of Greater Chicago.

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

Community Fund of Chicago.

Family Service Association of America.

Illinois Public Aid Commission.

Illinois Welfare Association.

National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice.

National Conference of Christians and Jews.

National Conference on Religion and Race.

National Conference on Social Welfare.

United Charities of Chicago.

Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago.

 

Raymond M. Hilliard papers, p. 1 of 31

 

Raymond M. Hilliard papers, p. 1 of 31